Dialogue on Writing: Rethinking ESL, Basic Writing, and First-Year Composition

By Geraldine Deluca; Len Fox et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
The First Day of Class:
Passing the Test
Ira Shor

Ira Shor is a professor in the City University of New York's Graduate School, where he originated the doctorate in composition/rhetoric in 1993. He also serves on the English faculty at the College of Staten Island, CUNY. His nine books include a recent three-volume set in honor of the late Paulo Freire, the noted Brazilian educator who was his friend and mentor, Critical Literacy in Action (for college language arts) and Education Is Politics (Vol. 1, K–12, and Vol. 2, Postsecondary Education Across the Curriculum). Shor also authored Empowering Education (1992) and When Students Have Power (1996), two foundational texts in critical teaching. Shor came out of the public schools of New York City, where he grew up in the Jewish working class neighborhood of the South Bronx, went to the Bronx High School of Science, and then to the University of Michigan and University of Wisconsin. The following selection is from Empowering Education: Critical Teaching for Social Change (University of Chicago Press, 1992).

Like many kids, I loved learning but not schooling. I especially dreaded the first day of class. I would wake up early, jump nervously out of bed, and run to open the window. From my fifth-floor apartment in the South Bronx, where I grew up, I would lean out and see my old public school across Bruckner Boulevard, a street busy with a stream of traffic on the way to Manhattan. Sometimes, if I was lucky, a big gray fog bank rolled in from the Long Island Sound, covered the weedy flats behind the school where Gypsies camped and veterans once lived in Quonset huts, and swallowed P. S. 93. My dreams were answered. Miraculously, the school had disappeared. Years later, as a college teacher, I was walking to the first day of my basic writing class. I had a black book bag on my shoulder, a lesson plan in hand, and butterflies in my stomach.

I entered B building on our concrete campus and climbed the stairs, passing students smoking and talking loudly to each other. My writing class was in room 321, a place I knew well, with its gray tile floor, cinder-block walls, dirty venetian blinds, fiber glass chairs and cold fluorescent lights. Since I

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dialogue on Writing: Rethinking ESL, Basic Writing, and First-Year Composition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 488

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.