Dialogue on Writing: Rethinking ESL, Basic Writing, and First-Year Composition

By Geraldine Deluca; Len Fox et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
Listening for Difference
Roni Natov

Roni Natov is Professor of English at Brooklyn College. She has taught classes in the Literature of Cultural Diversity and Cross-Cultural Writing. With Geraldine DeLuca, she cofounded and coedited for 17 years The Lion and the Unicorn: A Critical Journal of Children's Literature. She wrote Leon Garfield (Twayne, 1994) and is currently writing The Poetics of Childhood (Garland Press, to be published 2002).

Every teacher worth her words knows how deeply she has learned from her students: how being open and accessible in that space she and her students occupy—which is neither public nor fully private, but sometimes the best of both, which can feel secularly sacred—cannot help but change her, make her wider. I believe that the goal of education is, in Maxine Hong Kingston's words, “to make my mind large as the universe is large, so that there is room for paradoxes” (35). My classroom is the place where students, in their variety of thoughts, questions, reflections, in their diverse spoken and written languages, present the challenge to make my imagination large enough to create an inclusive environment for them. Here, in this place of intellectual improvisation, I am forced to become porous, to enter a liminal world created in this moment of spontaneous interaction that has never been before and never will occur again. Here, in this place of chaos and uncertainty, I am being taught, actually forced, to listen for difference. Here I am learning to avoid indulging what is at times my own and my students' overwhelming desire to focus on similarity, to identify like experience and feeling, to merge. Here I work not to flee but rather to inhabit those areas of faulty or partial comprehension, where we are left without closure. Nothing in my education, nothing I can remember being taught at home or at school or in this culture at large has prepared me for this work.

I am an English professor at Brooklyn College, an urban liberal arts college whose student population is approximately 40% nonnative speakers and includes a large “nontraditional student body, ” approximately 80% of whom work 20 to 40 hours per week and often help support other family

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dialogue on Writing: Rethinking ESL, Basic Writing, and First-Year Composition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 488

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.