Dialogue on Writing: Rethinking ESL, Basic Writing, and First-Year Composition

By Geraldine Deluca; Len Fox et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 22
The Argument for Writing Across
the Curriculum
Toby Fulwiler

Toby Fulwiler has directed the writing program at the University of Vermont since 1983. Before that he taught at Michigan Tech and the University of Wisconsin where, in 1973, he also received his Ph. D. in American Literature. At Vermont he teaches introductory and advanced writing classes, his newest courses emphasizing creative nonfiction. He recently coedited The Letter Book (Boynton/Cook, 2000) as well as The Journal Book for At Risk Writers (Boynton/Cook, 1999) and coauthored The Blair Handbook (3rd ed., Prentice Hall, 2000). Other books include College Writing (2nd ed., Boynton/Cook, 1997), When Writing Teachers Teach Literature (Boynton/ Cook, 1996), The Working Writer (Prentice Hall, 1998), Teaching with Writing (Boynton/Cook, 1986) and The Journal Book (Boynton/Cook, 1987). He conducts writing workshops for teachers in all grade levels and across the disciplines, riding to workshop sites, weather permitting, on his BMW motorcycle. The following article is from Writing Across the Disciplines: Research into Practice, edited by Art Young and Toby Fulwiler (Boynton/ Cook, 1986).

In order to make the abstract concept of “writing across the curriculum” more concrete, the Humanities Department of Michigan Tech planned, organized, and conducted a series of off-campus writing workshops to which teachers from all disciplines were invited. These workshops introduced participants to three premises which we believed crucial to developing a truly interdisciplinary writing program. We wanted teachers to understand (1) that the act of composing a piece of writing is a complex intellectual process; (2) that writing is a mode of learning as well as communicating; and (3) that people have trouble writing for a variety of reasons; no quick fixes will “solve” everybody's writing problem. In the next few pages I'd like to explain these assumptions, as they are the core ideas around which all of our workshop activities are designed.

-345-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dialogue on Writing: Rethinking ESL, Basic Writing, and First-Year Composition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 488

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.