Dialogue on Writing: Rethinking ESL, Basic Writing, and First-Year Composition

By Geraldine Deluca; Len Fox et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 24
Opinion: The Wyoming
Conference Resolution Opposing
Unfair Salaries and Working
Conditions for Post-Secondary
Teachers of Writing
Linda R. Robertson, Sharon Crowley, and Frank Lentricchia

Linda R. Robertson is Professor of Rhetoric and the codirector of the Media and Society program at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Her scholarship includes publications in the fields of economic rhetoric, political rhetoric, and war propaganda. She is completing a study of the propaganda of the first air war. Sharon Crowley specializes in the history and theory of rhetoric and the history of composition. She codirects the Ph. D program in Rhetoric and Linguistics at Arizona State University. Her recent books are Composition in the University (1998), which won MLA's Mina Shaughnessy prize for the year's best book on teaching, and the second edition of Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students (1998), with Debra Hawhee. Frank Lentricchia is Katherine Everett Gilbert Professor of English and Literature at Duke University. His chief interests lie in American literature, history of poetry, modernism, the role of the intellectual in culture, and the history and theory of criticism. His publications include Robert Frost: Modern Poetics and the Landscapes of Self (1975), After the New Criticism (1980), Criticism and Social Change (1983), Introducing Don DeLillo (1991), Modernist Quartet (1994), The Music of the Inferno (1999), and Lucchesi and The Whale (2001). He was editorial chair of South Atlantic Quarterly for five years. The following article is from College English, 49, March 1987.

Members who attend this year's Conference on College Communication and Composition will have an opportunity to vote on the Wyoming Conference Resolution, which has been proposed by participants attending the Wyoming Conference on English this June. The resolution calls upon the Executive Committee to establish grievance procedures for post-secondary writing teachers seeking to redress unfair working conditions and salaries. The reso-

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