Dialogue on Writing: Rethinking ESL, Basic Writing, and First-Year Composition

By Geraldine Deluca; Len Fox et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 28
Places to Stand: The Reflective
Writer-Teacher-Writer in
Composition
Wendy Bishop

Wendy Bishop teaches writing at Florida State University and is the author, coauthor, and/or editor of a number of books, essays, and articles on composition and creative writing pedagogy and writing research. Most recently, she has published The Subject Is Reading and Ethnographic Writing Research (Boynton/Cook) and Thirteen Ways of Looking for a Poem and Metro: Journeys in Writing Creatively (Longman). She lives in Tallahassee, Florida, with her husband, Dean, and two children, Morgan and Tait. The following article is from College Composition and Communication, 51, September 1999.

We are always in a rhetoric. We may see those others in rhetorics not our own; if we do, they are likely to seem whimsical, odd, uninformed, selfish, wrong, mad, even alien. Sometimes, of course, we don't see them at all—they are outside our normality, beyond or beneath notice; they don't occur as humans. Often as not, we don't see our own rhetoric; it is already normality, already truth, already the way to see existence. When we remark, as we have become accustomed to remark, that all discourse is ideological, we probably exclude our own. It is the truth, against which ideological discourses can be detected and measured.

—Jim Corder (98)

Peter Elbow, Janet Emig, Toby Fulwiler, Ken Macrorie, James Moffett, Donald Murray, Mike Rose, and Nancy Sommers readily come to mind as influences on the “figure” of writer-teacher or teacher-writer in composition studies: one who advocates that teachers write with and for their writing students as well as with and for their colleagues. Of course, many others have helped to shape this image. In the 1960s and 1970s, for instance, Marvin Bell (1964), William Stafford (1964), Stephen Minot (1976), and Sheila Ortiz-Taylor (1979) published essays in CCC, to be followed a decade later by Anthony Petrosky (1982), Alice Brand (1987), Brett Lott (1988), and Ken Kesey (1990) who presented their ideas through CCC

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