Leadership Development: Paths to Self-Insight and Professional Growth

By Manuel London | Go to book overview

9
Development Programs
The changing nature of leadership development parallels the changing nature of leadership in the face of rapid evolution in technology, competition, and the international economy. As pointed out in chapter lof this volume, leaders need to be strategists, attuned to multiple aspects of organizational performance, flexible, team facilitators, and continuous learners. Development programs increasingly use new technology to gather and provide feedback and deliver training. Workshops and simulations need to mirror reality and provide hands-on experience in dealing with real issues, often in a group setting.Examples of trends in leadership development programs include:
The availability of online 360-degree feedback surveys that can be formulated by the manager when the manager wants, not when the corporate human resources department dictates. Internet technology delivers, collects, codes, and feeds back the survey results.
Distance learning in the form of online delivery of courses and career information and resources. Companies provide this to their people, sometimes subscribing to a service shared by different companies, other times developing their own resources in a Web site. Considerable career information, not to mention job search announcements, are readily accessible on the Web.
Off-site training programs that ask managers to work in groups on real business problems. The workshop setting provides a nonthreatening environment that may open the participants to more risk taking than would occur on the job. Nevertheless, they have a chance to focus on real strategic problems and invent solutions that may actually be applied.
Temporary job assignments that are structured for fast track learning in order to build a cohort of experienced leaders ready for promotion. These positions reflect the changing nature of the business.

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