Academic Dishonesty: An Educator's Guide

By Bernard E. Whitley Jr.; Patricia Keith-Spiegel | Go to book overview

Preface
Why do students cheat?
What can be done to prevent it?
What are the consequences of ignoring academic dishonesty?
How should suspected students be confronted?
What sanctions are appropriate for students who violate the academic honesty policy?
What can the institution do to encourage a campus ethos of integrity?

Our goal is to provide readers with a concise handbook covering the full spectrum of issues related to academic dishonesty. To do so, we present research and theory on academic dishonesty and strategies for preventing, confronting, and managing the problem.

The book is divided into three parts. The first part reviews the existing published literature about academic dishonesty among college and univerz sity students and how faculty members respond to the problem. Chapter 1 addresses the issues of why academic dishonesty is an important problem in academia, the prevalence of the problem, the rationalizations some instructors use to minimize its importance or deny its existence, and some of the real difficulties involved in Confronting the problem. In chapter 2, we focus on definitions of academic dishonesty and how student and faculty differ in their perceptions of what behaviors constitute academic dishonesty. This chapter also describes the reasons and justifications students give for their dishonest acts, some of the institutional and student characteristics associz ated with academic dishonesty, and a theoretical model that helps explain the conditions under which cheating is most likely to occur.

The second part of the book presents practical advice designed to help college and university instructors and administrators deal proactively and effectively with academic dishonesty. Chapter 3 offers techniques for fostering academic integrity in the classroom. Chapter 4 presents tech-

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