The Ballad of America: The History of the United States in Song and Story

By John Anthony Scott | Go to book overview

IV

JACKSONIAN
AMERICA

THE END OF THE WAR OF 1812 marked the beginning of a new period in American history. The American people could now devote their full energies and attention to settling and developing the continent which they had won. Thus, 1815 marks the start of an era of unprecedented expansion, which continued in full swing until 1848. This period, 1815-1848, had a unity and a quality of its own, which entitle us to label it "Jacksonian." It possessed many of the attributes associated with Jacksonian democracy: raw materialism, driving expansion, but also generous enthusiasms and reforming zeals. Americans achieved a sense of stability derived from pride in their past and a feeling of abounding confidence in the future. This, of course, would change after 1848 and give way to a vastly different mood. For in the fifties, there was a growing preoccupation with the slavery crisis and a growing conviction of the inevitability of civil war.

In Jacksonian America, national development assumed a sectional form. A single nation was growing, developing, evolving; but it was organized into three clearly differentiated sections, or regions, each with its own distinct patterns of social, political, and economic life.

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The Ballad of America: The History of the United States in Song and Story
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Ballad of America - The History of the United States in Song and Story *
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Music xiii
  • I - The Colonial Period 1
  • The British Heritage 7
  • Colonial Songs and Ballads 30
  • II - The American Revolution 53
  • III - The Early National Period 91
  • IV - Jacksonian America 124
  • Sea and Immigration 126
  • The Westward Movement 159
  • Slavery Days 190
  • V - The Civil War 216
  • VI - Between the Civil War and the First World War 253
  • Farmers and Workers 257
  • Immigrants 284
  • The Negro People 301
  • VII - Between Two World Wars 324
  • VIII - Since the War 362
  • Sources 381
  • Recordings 400
  • Afterword 419
  • Index of Titles and First Lines 429
  • General Index 433
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