The Ballad of America: The History of the United States in Song and Story

By John Anthony Scott | Go to book overview

Sources

GENERAL

Charles Haywood, A Bibliography of North American Folklore and Folksong (New York: Dover Publications, 1961), is a guide to published materials and records. Supplement with R. Serge Denisoff, Songs of Protest, War and Peace: A Bibliography and Discography (Santa Barbara: ABC Clio Press, 1973), which focuses upon the role of song in antiwar and protest movements from the revolutionary era to the present. The best short introduction to United States historical ballads and song is Russell Ames, The Story ofAmerican Folksong (New York: Grosset and Dunlap, 1955). Music and lyrics for many songs are provided in a number of works. Highly recommended are: Margaret Boni, The Fireside Book of Folksongs (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1947); Joan Baez, The Joan Baez Songbook (New York: Ryerson Publishers, 1964); John Langstaff, Hi! Ho! The Rattlin' Bog and Other Folk Songs for Group Singing (New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1969); Alan Lomax, Folk Songs of North America (New York: Doubleday and Co., 1960); and Carl Sandburg, The American Songbag (New York: Harcourt, Brace and Co., 1927).

Another good and cheap source for songs is the collection of little songbooks made available by World Around Us Songs. The catalogue is obtainable by writing to:

World Around Us Songs
Rt 5 Box 398
Burnsville, N.C. 28714
(phone: 704-675-5343)

Much valuable material is also reproduced in Sing Out!, the folk song magazine whose address is 505 8th Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018. The informative essays which Pete Seeger contributed over many years to Sing Out! have been brought together by editor Josephine Schwartz and published in a single volume entitled The Incompleat Folksinger (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1972). A complete listing of all songs reproduced in Sing Out! since it began publication in the early 1950s is available upon request, as are many back issues of the magazine.

Ruth Crawford Seeger, American Folk Songs for Children (New York: Doubleday and Co., 1948) is in a class by itself, not only because it provides wonderful songs for parents and teachers to sing with children, but on account of the introductory essay which ex

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The Ballad of America: The History of the United States in Song and Story
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Ballad of America - The History of the United States in Song and Story *
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Music xiii
  • I - The Colonial Period 1
  • The British Heritage 7
  • Colonial Songs and Ballads 30
  • II - The American Revolution 53
  • III - The Early National Period 91
  • IV - Jacksonian America 124
  • Sea and Immigration 126
  • The Westward Movement 159
  • Slavery Days 190
  • V - The Civil War 216
  • VI - Between the Civil War and the First World War 253
  • Farmers and Workers 257
  • Immigrants 284
  • The Negro People 301
  • VII - Between Two World Wars 324
  • VIII - Since the War 362
  • Sources 381
  • Recordings 400
  • Afterword 419
  • Index of Titles and First Lines 429
  • General Index 433
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