Alexander Pope and His Eighteenth-Century Women Readers

By Claudia N. Thomas | Go to book overview

Preface

Alexander Pope and His Eighteenth-Century Women Readers is not a catchy title, but I hope it suggests a study not merely of Pope's influence on women writers but of the complex interactions between Pope and women readers and between women and Pope's writings throughout the century. Pope's attitude toward women is not simple to define; nor did women often receive his texts passively. I have tried to elucidate some of the choices Pope made in addressing women readers and some of the strategies women used in responding to him. Their imitations, appropriations, and repudiations of Pope constitute part of the history of women's entrance into the literary marketplace.

Alexander Pope did not function, to his contemporary women readers, as the bogey he sometimes appears to be in current criticism. For reasons both professional and personal, young Pope courted (some might say exploited) a newly identified female readership. His maneuvers succeeded; Pope's Homeric translations and such poems as "Eloisa to Abelard" remained favorites among women for generations. But Pope's inclusion of women had another, perhaps unanticipated, result: from his earliest readers on, women responded in kind to his writings. During his lifetime, women addressed themselves to Pope, some assuming his genuine interest in their welfare, others outraged by his affronts. To most, Pope was a potential correspondent rather than a distant inhabitant of Mount Olympus.

After his death, Pope increasingly took on the role of forefather to women writers, in a feminized version of what Harold Bloom has described as the struggle between an aspiring writer and a chosen predecessor. Since her death in 1689, Aphra Behn had been all but banished as an admissible foremother, and few women seemed eligible for that status until Elizabeth Rowe's death in 1737. In Pope, however, women discerned a male precursor not only sympathetic to their cultural predicament but in some ways sharing it, due to his physical, religious, and political liabilities. Pope's writings—unlike

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