Chu Hsi and Neo-Confucianism

By Wing-Tsit Chan | Go to book overview

Preface

THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE on Chu Hsi was made possible by many people from many countries. Dr. Hung Wo Ching raised all the funds for the conference. The response from various directions was overwhelming. The University of Hawaii and the American Council of Learned Societies became sponsors. The support of President Fujio Matsuda of the University of Hawaii was extremely generous. Thirty-six senior scholars, all specialists on Neo-Confucianism, came from several continents, including the 86-year-old Fung Yu-lan. Thirty-three younger scholars selected through an international competition also attended, as well as fourteen interested scholars who came as observers. The conference committee, with Dr. Wm. Theodore de Bary as chairman and Professors Irene Bloom, Wing-tsit Chan, Chung-ying Cheng, and Wei-ming Tu as members, planned the roster of participants and the program. Dr. Stephen Uhalley, Jr., Acting Director of the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies at the University of Hawaii, served as administrative director of the conference. He took care of all the business administration and readily mobilized all the resources of the Center. His assistant, Ms. Peggy Blumenthal, in her capacity as the assistant administrative director of the conference, conducted the daily operation with an efficiency and smoothness seldom seen in an international gathering. All members sang her praise, and we now add our encore. University of Hawaii faculty members chaired the various sessions and served as members of the Local Committee. Others performed duties on the Committee of Conference Historians, as interpreters, and as translators of papers from Chinese and Japanese into English. The East-West Center opened its facilities to us. To all these people and institutions, we reverently bow our heads three times.

Regarding the editing of this anthology, we have not insisted on uniformity or consistency, for scholars from diverse backgrounds must be free to express themselves in their own way. We have respected their styles as we have honored their opinions. At the same time, we want to accommodate our future readers, who may not be specialists in Neo-Confucianism. We have therefore reduced transliteration to a minimum. When transliteration is used, a translation is provided in parentheses or in a footnote. Officially we have followed the Wade-Giles system of transliteration, but any scholar who wanted to use the p'in-yin system was free to do so.

Translation of Chinese terms is always a controversial matter, since no Chi

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