Pompeii: Its Life and Art

By August Mau; Francis W. Kelsey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XLII
THREE HOUSES OF UNUSUAL PLAN

Fig. 172. - The house of Acceptus and Euhodia.

a. Colonnade.d. Bedroom.
b. Garden.f. Dining room.
c. Kitchen.g. Garden.
i. Bedroom with place for two beds.

IN the houses described in the preceding, chapters the distribution of the rooms is characterized by a certain regularity, which makes it possible to indicate the arrangements by reference to an ideal or normal plan. A

wide departure, however, is occasionally noted; and by way of three houses of unusual plan will be briefly presented here, first a house without an atrium, then one having an atrium but no compluvium, and, lastly, a large establishment built on terraces at different levels.


I. THE HOUSE OF ACCEPTUS AND EUHODIA

Sometimes a few rooms of a large house were cut off from the atrium and used as a separate dwelling; the original plan in such cases is easily determined. The number of houses built without an atrium in the beginning is exceedingly small. Among the pleasantest was the modest dwelling of Acceptus and Euhodia, on the south side of the double Insula in the eighth Region (VIII. v.-vi. 39); the names are taken from a couple of election notices painted on the front, in which they appear together.

From the street one passed directly under a colonnade (Fig. 172, a) in two stories, facing a small garden (b), from which it

-341-

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