The Roman Eastern Frontier and the Persian Wars (AD 226-363): A Documentary History

By Michael H. Dodgeon; Samuel N. C. Lieu | Go to book overview

5

From Probus to Diocletian

5.1.1. The accession of Bahram II (276-293)

Agathias IV, 24, 6: Varanes’ (i.e. Bahram I’s) son 1 had the same name as his father and reigned for seventeen years.

(Cameron, p. 123)


5.1.2. Peace between Probus and the Persians

SHA Prob. 17, 1-6: Having finally established peace in all parts of Pamphylia and the other provinces adjacent to Isauria, he turned his course to the East. 2. He also subdued the Blemmyae, 2 and the captives taken from them he sent back to Rome and thereby created a wondrous impression upon the amazed Roman people. 3. Besides this, he rescued from servitude to the barbarians the cities of Coptos and Ptolemais and restored them to Roman laws. 4. By this he achieved such fame that the Parthians (sic) sent envoys to him, confessing their fear and arrogance and then went back to their homes in greater fear than before. 5. The letter, moreover, which he wrote to Narseus (sic),3 rejecting the gifts which the king had sent, is said to have been as follows: ‘I marvel that you have sent us so few of the riches, all of which will shortly be ours. For the time being, keep all those things in which you take such pleasure. If ever we wish to have them, we know how we ought to get them. ’ 6. On the receipt of this letter Narseus was greatly frightened, the more so because he had learned that Coptos and Ptolemais had been set free from the Blemmyae, who had previously held them, and that they, who had once been the terror of nations, had been put to the sword.

(Magie, iii, p. 371)

Moses Khorenats’i, Hist. Arm. (II), 77 (Thomson, p. 224): see Appendix 2, p. 317

-111-

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