Great Britain and the Creation of the League of Nations: Strategy, Politics, and International Organization, 1914-1919

By George W. Egerton | Go to book overview

5

War and Peace:
Preparing for the Peace Conference

The German appeal for peace presented Allied statesmen with the question of whether they could fashion an armistice that would guarantee their hard-won position of military superiority. Moreover, since the German note explicitly requested a peace based on Wilson's Fourteen Points, Allied leaders were faced with the additional task of deciding upon the expediency and wisdom of a commitment to Wilson's program as a basis for the ultimate peace settlement. Both the military terms and the political preconditions granted Germany would have major consequences for the eventual peacemaking, and the tense prearmistice negotiations presaged in many ways the issues and strategic choices Britain and her allies would face in the impending peace conference.

House arrived in Paris 26 October 1918 with the express purpose of committing the Allies to Wilson's program. There followed several days of acrimonious negotiations with the Allies during which, despite House's threats of a separate American peace, Britain and the Allies insisted on reservations that protected their major interests and objectives. The compromise suggested by Lloyd George —Allied agreement to make peace based on Wilson's Fourteen Points and subsequent addresses, with reservations on freedom of the seas and reparations—was accepted only after high-pressured private negotiations and a written promise by the British prime minister to permit future discussion of the freedom of the seas in light of changing conditions.

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Great Britain and the Creation of the League of Nations: Strategy, Politics, and International Organization, 1914-1919
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.