New Deal Labor Policy and the American Industrial Economy

By Stanley Vittoz | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
I use the word "prestige" here in keeping with the meaning of prestigio as em- ployed by Antonio Gramsci in his analysis of bourgeois cultural hegemony. The idea is very capably evaluated in context with a number of closely allied concepts in Marx- ist social theory by Femia, "Hegemony and Consciousness."
2.
Williams, Contours of American History, pp. 345 ff.; Weinstein, Corporate Ideal, for the problem of interclass conflict and its attempted resolution along essen- tially conservative lines. For the politics and attempted resolution of intraclass con- flict during the Progressive era, see Kolko, Triumph of Conservatism.
3.
For a recent review of the topic see Foner, "Why Is There No Socialism in the United States?"
4.
Kolko, "Intelligence and the Myth of Capitalist Rationality."
5.
Gilbert, Designing the Industrial State.
6.
As to the matter of "allied" revisionist currents, perhaps the most notable exam- ple of what I have in mind here is Hays, "Politics of Reform."
7.
Bernstein, "New Deal"; Conkin, FDR and the Origins of the Welfare State; Zinn, Politics of History, pp. 118-36.
8.
Leuchtenburg, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal, pp. 336, 347.
9.
Bernstein, "New Deal," p. 281.
10.
A short list of relevant sources in this regard might include Hofstadter, Ameri- can Political Tradition; Holt, "The New Deal and the American Anti-Statist Tradi- tion" ; Hawley, The New Deal and the Problem of Monopoly; Rosenof, Dogma, De- pression, and the New Deal; Arnold, Folklore of Capitalism; and Lynd and Lynd, Middletown in Transition.
11.
Auerbach, "New Deal, Old Deal."
12.
For example, Radosh, "Myth of the New Deal." See also Domhoff, Higher Circles, pp. 218-50; and Hurd, "New Deal Labor Policy." What emerges here is something approximating a slightly sophisticated version of "Labor Frontism," which was first developed by Robert A. Brady as a comparative thesis on the origins of modem industrial totalitarianism: Business as a System of Power, pp. 274-87. Cf. Corey, Decline of American Capitalism, p. 99 and passim, who, along with Brady,

-175-

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New Deal Labor Policy and the American Industrial Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Deal Labor Policy and the American Industrial Economy *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • New Deal Labor Policy and the American Industrial Economy *
  • Introduction 3
  • Part One - Economic Foundations of Industrial Politics Before the New Deal *
  • 1 - Lean Years 15
  • 2 - Protocol of Peace 34
  • 3 - The Miners' Bargain 47
  • Part Two - Labor and the Nira: a Concert of Interests *
  • 4 - Legislative Odyssey 73
  • 5 - Codified Capitalism, I 97
  • 6 - Codified Capitalism, II 119
  • Part Three - Labors "Second" New Deal: a Matter of Equity *
  • 7 - Politics: the Wagner Act 137
  • 8 - Economics: the Stakes of Power 153
  • Conclusion 165
  • Notes 175
  • Bibliography 217
  • Index 237
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