The Literature of the Spanish People: From Roman Times to the Present Day

By Gerald Brenan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
THE PERIOD OF THE CATHOLIC KINGS

THE period from the accession of the Catholic Kings, Ferdinand and Isabella, in l479 to the election of their grandson Charles to the Imperial throne in 1519 marks a transition from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Events of immense importance took place during these years--the conquest of Granada from the Moors, the discovery of America, the expulsion of the Jews from Spain, the setting up of the Inquisition, as well as other less dramatic ones that had a special influence on literature--the introduction of printing in 1473 and the publication of the first Spanish grammar in 1492 by the great humanist Nebrija. The foundation by Cardinal Ximenes in 1508 of the new university of Alcalá de Henares to encourage the study of Latin, Greek and Hebrew was also to have an important though delayed influence.

One effect of these changes was to break the rule of the great noble houses, which had almost monopolized literature during the previous century, and to bring to the front writers and poets who, though attached to the court, belonged to the class of the smaller gentry. Technically speaking, their verse is less perfect than that of the great magnates, probably because the influence of French poetry had declined, but it is more varied and spontaneous. Popular influences were much stronger and one of the principal measures used was the villancico. There was also a considerable increase of religious poetry, written often by monks and in a much more devotional and popular tone than the stoic-religious verse of the previous century. Fray Ambrosio Montesino, a Franciscan who was chaplain to Queen Isabella, is the best of these poets: he had been influenced by the Italian Fra Jacopone da Todi and his romances and villancicos, which were written to popular airs, have a charm and tenderness that one does not often find in Spanish secular poetry. Tenderness in Spanish literature is as a rule given

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Literature of the Spanish People: From Roman Times to the Present Day
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 500

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.