Wilson and His Peacemakers: American Diplomacy at the Paris Peace Conference, 1919

By Arthur Walworth | Go to book overview

17

Compromises with France

The Four, having weathered several crises without a break, were coming to grips in April with issues on which it seemed possible that the victorious alliance would split. Five months had passed since the conclusion of the armistice. While American and British idealists had forced the Peace Conference to give much of its time to measures designed to secure peace among all nations, serious threats had arisen to that community of nations which had emerged from the wartime entente.

The malaise into which public opinion had fallen seeped into the journal of the assistant chief of the American press bureau. "So far the Peace Conference has failed magnificently," he wrote. "It has not brought the peace and the new world order for which all humanity cries out.... People everywhere are becoming impatient, almost belligerent, at the continuation of discussions that seem to lead nowhere. The question that is posing itself, especially in France, is that most tragic of all questions, 'Have we really won the war?' The statesmen ... are united in promises of results.... They have made similar promises before, always unfulfilled and perhaps worse, unfulfilled without explanation. At the moment ... the obstacles before an agreement are stupendous.... Yet failure ... would bring about a period of chaos and disruption unparalled in history." Some Americans who hoped for the emergence of "a diplomatic commander-in-chief who might save the peace as Foch had saved the war" thought Woodrow Wilson "the one man in the world" who could fill this role. 1.

In the early weeks of April the anxiety of Great Britain about its sea power had been to some extent allayed. However, Wilson's deep commitment to the peace of the entire world required him to deal with other issues that an expedient politician might wish to dodge. The essential claims of France, Italy, and Japan were still unsatisfied. These major powers, proud and willful, had essential purposes that were too provocative of strife to be entrusted by the Council of Four to advisory bodies. Their claims were considered by the inner council, and a series of crises arose.

The question of the security of France's eastern frontier came to a settlement after Wilson's recovery from illness. Clemenceau was weighing two alternatives in talks with his advisers: France acting alone on the left bank, or France brought back to the frontier of 1814 and allied with America and England. Refusing to commit himself to various policies that were espoused by prominent Frenchmen, Clemenceau was tenaciously exerting the leadership of his beloved country that he felt no one else could exercise so well as he, and that it was expected he would lose as soon as a peace was concluded. On March 25 he gave warning in the Council of

____________________
1.
Sweetser notes, April 6, 1919, Sweetser papers, L.C.

-321-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wilson and His Peacemakers: American Diplomacy at the Paris Peace Conference, 1919
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 618

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.