Contemporary English Literature

By Mark Longaker; Edwin C. Bolles | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THE ORGANIZATION of material in this book conforms with that of the other books in this series. After a brief consideration of the historical background and time-spirit of the different phases of the contemporary period, the method of procedure is topical. Within the topical divisions of poetry, novel, drama, and miscellaneous prose, the arrangement is generally chronological. In the treatment of particular movements and groups, however, it has seemed more practicable at times to proceed from a discussion of major figures to those of lesser importance. In the many instances in which an author's works extend to several literary forms, the works, regardless of type, are considered in the principal entry of the particular author. Thus Hardy's novels and poetry, Galsworthy's novels and dramas are considered under the entries of Hardy and Galsworthy respectively.

The general bibliographies are arranged according to literary type, with subdivisions indicated in so far as they prove helpful. The reference works on poetry, for example, are subdivided into anthologies, biographical and critical studies, and discussions of poetic theory and principle. In the bibliographies of individual authors, the order of arrangement is generally from comprehensive treatment to the treatment of particular facets of the author's life and works. The chronologies of authors' works and the lists of bibliographical items are often selective rather than exhaustive; and in the reference works, reviews and newspaper notices are not included. Only places of publication other than New York and London are listed in the bibliographies.

Publishers have been generous in granting permission for

-v-

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Contemporary English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Poetry & Fiction - 1890-1914 1
  • Verse Of Two World Wars 221
  • Poetry & Fiction 1918-1950 253
  • The Drama 1890-1950 386
  • Other Prose 1890-1950 422
  • Bibliography 493
  • Index 499
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