Topics in American Art since 1945

By Lawrence Alloway | Go to book overview

ALLAN KAPROW,
TWO VIEWS

I

Allan Kaprow's book Assemblages, Environments and Happenings was designed by the artist and the first section has a sequence of lively photographs, captioned by Kaprow in awkward, tough, hand-printed letters. A run of these words and phrases, printed like a poem (one line per double page spread), catches the evocative potential of Happenings and display the lyrical side of the author:

Specters from refuse
Obsession
Enchantment
Out of gutters and garbage cans
People inside
Statues inside
Fragile geometries
Science fictions
And immaterial spaces
Objects hung on panel
Days to be moved
Panels to rearrange
Caves
Chrysalis
Animals
The animal, nods, sings, jigs
Endless....

Kaprow records in the Preface that his book was written in 1959-60, revised in 1961, and revised again later. More has happened to

____________________
SOURCE: A composite of two pieces: (1) "Art in Escalation," Arts Magazine, XLI/3 (December, 1966-January, 1967), 40-43; (2) from The Nation (October 20, 1969), 419-421.

-195-

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Topics in American Art since 1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Topics in American Art Since 1945 *
  • Contents 7
  • List of Illustrations 9
  • Introduction 11
  • Acknowledgments 13
  • Abstract Expressionism 15
  • The Biomorphic '40s 17
  • Melpomene and Graffiti - Adolph Gottlieb's Early Work 25
  • The American Sublime 31
  • Barnett Newman - The Stations of the Cross and the Subjects of the Artist 42
  • Jackson Pollock's Black Paintings 52
  • Jackson Pollock's "Psychoanalytic Drawings" 58
  • Willem De Kooning 62
  • The Sixties, I - Hard Edge and Systems 65
  • Leon Polk Smith 67
  • Systemic Painting 76
  • Serial Forms 92
  • Sol Lewitt 96
  • Agnes Martin - (with an Appendix) 100
  • Gesture into Form - The Later Paintings of Norman Bluhm 111
  • The Sixties, II - Pop Art 117
  • Pop Art - The Words 119
  • Jim Dine 123
  • Rauschenberg's Graphics 125
  • Jasper Johns' Map 136
  • Marilyn as Subject Matter 140
  • Roy Lichtenstein's Period Style 145
  • The Reuben Gallery - A Chronology 151
  • In Place 155
  • The Sixties, III - Problems of Representation 161
  • Hi-Way Culture - (with Notes on Alan D'Arcangelo) 163
  • Art as Likeness - (with a Note on Post-Pop Art) 171
  • George Segal 182
  • Photo-Realism 185
  • Art and Interface 193
  • Allan Kaprow, Two Views 195
  • Artists and Photographs 201
  • The Expanding and Disappearing Work of Art 207
  • Stolen - (with Arakawa: an Interview) 213
  • Radio City Music Hall 218
  • Robert Smithson's Development 221
  • Art Criticism and Society 237
  • Notes on Op Art 239
  • The Public Sculpture Problem 245
  • The Uses and Limits of Art Criticism 251
  • Index 271
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