No Sense of Place: The Impact of Electronic Media on Social Behavior

By Joshua Meyrowitz | Go to book overview

NOTES *

Preface
1
American Telephone and Telegraph, 1981, p. 87, reports that there are over 96 "main res- idence telephones" (as opposed to extensions) for every 100 households in the United States. The A. C. Nielsen Company, 1982, p. 3, indicates that 98% of American households own at least one television set. Ownership has been over 90% since 1962 (Nielsen, 1977, p. 5).
2
Hiebert et al., 1982, p. 10.
3
Martin Mayer, 1977, p. 238, reports that poor people share with others in the society a view of the telephone as an "extension of self" and therefore prefer a flat rate telephone service with no counting of telephone calls or call length, even if such a flat rate service costs them more than a rate based on usage. Philip Davis, Supervisor, Bureau of Program Compliance, New Hampshire Division of Welfare, personal communication, November 1983, notes that all states consider at least one inexpensive radio, television, and telephone as part of the basic necessities of life—along with items such as beds and food—and therefore do not include such media as "resources" when calculating benefits under programs such as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). See note 4 in Chapter 7 for information on access to media in prisons.
4
A. C. Nielsen, 1983, p. 6.
5
President Johnson initiated the use of three side-by-side television receivers with remote controls so that he could monitor all three network news programs at once. The system was first set up in Johnson's bedroom and later duplicated in the Oval Office, the LBJ ranch, and, on one occasion at least, in Johnson's hospital room (Culbert, 1981, p. 218).
6
A picture of Charles Manson watching television in his cell appeared in Time magazine in September 1982 ("Inside Looking Out," 1982, pp. 54-5).
7
Meyrowitz, 1974. The theoretical portion of the study is extended in Meyrowitz, 1979.

Chapter 1
1
Goffman, 1967, p. 3.
____________________
*
These notes contain abbreviated citations of author and year. All published articles and books are listed in the bibliography.

-341-

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