Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945

By George J. Sánchez | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Studies of Mexican-origin people in the United States are full of debates over appropriate labeling. I will add little toward a resolution of this problem. Since my study involves the process by which Mexican immigrants adapt to American society, I have chosen to simplify for the sake of clarity a rather com- plex and politically charged issue.

Those born in Mexico who reside temporarily in the United States are called "Mexican," "Mexicano," and "Mexican immigrant" interchangeably. "Mexican American" denotes both those born in the United States and those who change their citizenship status. I also use "Chicano" as an umbrella term for both groups, although I am aware that most of the individuals described in this study would not have used this term to describe themselves. "Latino" is used to describe the entire population of immigrants from Latin America and their descendants.

In this study, I will also use the terms "white," "Anglo American," and "Euro-American" interchangeably, although I also acknowledge the great diver- sity existing among those so designated. When appropriate, I refer to the na- tional origins of subgroups within this "Anglo American" population.

2.
La Opinión, 10-13 June 1927.
3.
Interview with Zeferino Ramírez, "Biographies and Case Histories" II folder, Z-R5, Manuel Gamio collection, Bancroft Library, University of Califor- nia, Berkeley; interview with Beatrice Palomares, 3 Jan. 1991, conducted by George J. Sánchez.
4.
Interview with Zeferino Ramírez, 2, 5-7, Gamio collection; interview with Beatrice Palomares.
5.
See La Opinión editorial, 11 June 1927.
6.
"The Quest for National Character," in The Reconstruction of American History, John Higham, ed. (New York: Hutchinson, 1962), 197-98.
7.
The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the Amer- ican People, 2nd ed., enlarged (1951; Boston: Little, Brown, 1973), 3. Handlin extended his argument in the early 1970s to include non-whites in the United States in this enlarged 2nd edition. See the combative, if rambling, added Chap-

-277-

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