Sports and Freedom: The Rise of Big-Time College Athletics

By Ronald A. Smith | Go to book overview

II

Sport, the Extracurriculum,
and the Idea of Freedom

FOOTBALL WAS PLAYED every fair fall day at Dartmouth College in the mid-1830s. Ex-president S. C. Bartlett recalled his earlier freshman playing days at the New Hampshire institution. He remembered a senior who used "stupendous boots he had made on purpose with soles fully a half inch thick." Bartlett, nearly six decades after the event, could still see the hulking upperclassman as he stood "on the extreme edge of a dense, surging mass of struggles, the foot-ball far out of sight in the centre, but the boots going like a horizontal trip-hammer" in one of those glorious class battles. 1 It appeared at least as important to incapacitate the lowly "frosh" as it was to score the next goal. Though seniors often participated, the annual freshman-sophomore class battle was probably the most bitterly fought contest. The Dartmouth faculty, more interested in piety and the classics, was nevertheless concerned about the confrontation between the lower two classes. 2

There was a remarkable change in college life between the 1830s, when a faculty was concerned about interclass rivalries, and the 1890s, when an ex-president wrote a history of athletics at Dartmouth. In the middle decades of the nineteenth century the college extracurriculum became highly developed at Dartmouth and elsewhere, and sport came to dominate the extracurriculum while challenging the curriculum for importance on the college campus. In that time, an American ideology based upon the rhetoric of the

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sports and Freedom: The Rise of Big-Time College Athletics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.