Swarming on the Battlefield: Past, Present, and Future

By Sean J. A. Edwards | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The military application of emerging technologies for communications and information processing is likely to change the way military force is managed and applied. Oftentimes. a dramatic improvement in technology brings about an equally dramatic change in military doctrine and organization. One possibility is a doctrine based on swarming, whereby military units organized as networks use dispersed yet integrated operations.

Swarming has occurred throughout military history. and the lessons of this past experience may offer insights into a possible future application of swarming. Very little historical research has been con ducted on the use of swarming, let alone a comprehensive review of swarming as a major theme within military history. This monograph seeks to address this deficiency by analyzing ten swarming cases. The conclusions of this historical analysis are then applied to a discussion of future swarming. This work should be of interest to U.S. policymakers, commanders, planners, and others who desire an understanding of swarming and its potential for future light operations or as a new way of warfare.

This study was prepared for the project “Swarming and the Future of Conflict,” which was directed by John Arquilla and David Ronfeldt. The project was sponsored by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence (C31) and conducted in the International Security and Defense Policy Center of RAND's National Defense Research Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the unified commands, and the defense agencies.

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Swarming on the Battlefield: Past, Present, and Future
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figure vii
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xxiii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Methodology for Historical Analysis 7
  • Chapter Three - Historical Cases 13
  • Chapter Four - Historical Conclusions 53
  • Chapter Five - Toward a Swarming Doctrine? 65
  • Chapter Six - Conclusion 87
  • References 89
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