Swarming on the Battlefield: Past, Present, and Future

By Sean J. A. Edwards | Go to book overview

Chapter Six
CONCLUSION

Swarming is not new. During the pre-gunpowder age, swarming armies enjoyed quite a bit of success on the Eurasian steppe and elsewhere; more recently, light infantry insurgents have fared well against conventional armies. The question is, Does a role exist for swarming today or in the future? History strongly suggests the answer is yes—if three capabilities can be achieved: superior situational awareness, standoff fire, and elusiveness. If emerging technology provides these capabilities, the United States could enter a watershed era of modern swarming that involves dispersed but integrated operations. Any doctrine of the future that relies on dispersed operations, such as the Army After Next or Urban Warrior, could benefit from a sustained research effort on swarming.

A radical departure from existing doctrine, a doctrine of swarming would require many issues to be worked out regarding tactics, logistics, command, and organization. Implementing such radical change, even on just a portion of U.S. ground forces, will require a careful yet bold plan that includes further research, gaming and simulation, and unit exercises before a prototypical swarming force is feasible. As well, the details of decentralized command and control will need to be worked out. A technological or doctrinal answer must be found for the logistics problems posed by a vehicle-based swarm force. But, because many of the likely conflict scenarios of the future—power-projection missions, counterinsurgencies, dispersed operations, and peace operations—appear to be conducive to a swarming doctrine, the investment will be worthwhile.

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Swarming on the Battlefield: Past, Present, and Future
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figure vii
  • Tables ix
  • Summary xi
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xxiii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Methodology for Historical Analysis 7
  • Chapter Three - Historical Cases 13
  • Chapter Four - Historical Conclusions 53
  • Chapter Five - Toward a Swarming Doctrine? 65
  • Chapter Six - Conclusion 87
  • References 89
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 93

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.