Darwinism and the Study of Society: A Centenary Symposium

By Michael Banton | Go to book overview

J. BRONOWSKI


Introduction

One merit of the subject of this book is that it is fresh. Darwinism and the Study of Society is not an examination topic, nor does it fit readymade into an established academic field. There are no set rules to say how the theme shall be treated, and there are not even many precedents. Therefore the authors of the essays that follow have had to find their own way, and this not only in detail but in their very conception of the subject. Each author has had to weigh the two parts of the title himself, Darwinism and The Study of Society, and to judge for himself where the centre of gravity of the two parts falls. As a result, what each author has written is as interesting in revealing his total outlook, his imaginative vision of the mechanism of society, as in the more formal matter which he presents.

Because each author has interpreted the subject afresh, their essays range widely. At one end, the range touches on Charles Darwin's most personal thoughts, his scruples about religion, for example, which Professor Basil Willey and Mr. George Shepperson both recall. At the other end lies, say, the subtle system of connections which must exist if the totality of an animal's evolutionary traits is to form a stable and self-perpetuating unity, which Professor C. H. Waddington discusses. If I were to try in this Introduction to build a mosaic of all these different approaches, I should succeed only in making a miniature blur, for ideas so diverse cannot be treated in summary. What I shall do instead is to focus on two or three preoccupations, the two or three common points of view, which run through most of the essays. By drawing attention to these common assumptions at the beginning, I hope that I can prepare the reader to ask questions of the essays as he reads them and to see how far the book as a whole answers his unwritten questions.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Darwinism and the Study of Society: A Centenary Symposium
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Darwin's Place in the History of Thought 1
  • References 16
  • The Intellectual Background of Charles Darwin's Student Years at Edinburgh 17
  • Darwinism and Human Society in Retrospect 37
  • Natural and Social Selection 49
  • The Human Evolutionary System 63
  • Evolution and History 83
  • Social Evolution 95
  • Conclusions 125
  • Social Mind and Animal Brain 129
  • Communication in Animal and Human Societies 139
  • Social Norms and Social Evolution the Analogy of Animal Behaviour 153
  • The Autonomy of Post-Darwinian Sociology 167
  • Notes on Contributors 181
  • Index 185
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 192

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.