Health Resources in the United States: Personnel, Facilities, and Services

By George W. Bachman | Go to book overview

PREFACE

In its broad research programs, the Brookings Institution has had many occasions to study health problems. In the early thirties, at the request of numerous state governments, it conducted surveys of state governmental organization and administration, including public health and public welfare. A similar study of Montgomery County, Maryland in 1941 included welfare and public health services. Even earlier, a series of monographs on federal government agencies covered the work of the Public Health Service, the Medical Department of the Army, the Food, Drug, and Insecticide Administration, and also the health functions of the Children's Bureau, the Office of Indian Affairs, and other government agencies. Similarly, our comprehensive study entitled The Problem of Indian Administration surveyed health problems.

Another group of studies has concentrated on the economic aspects of health and welfare problems. These include: Relief and Social Security, The Issue of Compulsory Health Insurance, The Cost and Financing of Social Security, Public Welfare Organization, and Workers' Health and Safety: A Statistical Program.

The present study, Health Resources in the United States, was undertaken with several objectives in mind: (1) to ascertain the extent of health resources available in the United States; (2) to describe the major private and public health programs; and (3) to furnish a basis for further study.

This study in itself is not intended to furnish a solution to health problems, but the assembling of existing information on health resources in a single volume provides a basic and convenient research tool for an appraisal of health services available to the American people.

Research now under way in the Brookings Institution is directed toward a determination of the requirements for additional resources, and an evaluation of the methods by which health services are administered and financed.

The study was directed by Dr. George W. Bachman, senior staff member, who has had wide experience in experimental medicine and public health. While at Columbia University he directed for eleven years the School of Tropical Medicine in Puerto Rico. During World War II he was the representative of the American Bureau

-v-

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Health Resources in the United States: Personnel, Facilities, and Services
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Brookings Institution ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Health of the Nation: Vital Statistics 5
  • Chapter I - Health Progress Since 1900 9
  • Chapter II - Variations in the Level of Health 14
  • Part II - Personnel 55
  • Chapter III - Physicians, Dentists, Nurses 60
  • Chapter V - Medical Group Practice 96
  • Part III - Facilities and Services 111
  • Chapter VI - Hospitals and Related Facilities 114
  • Chapter VII - Specified Diseases and Disabilities 135
  • Chapter VIII - Environmental Health 199
  • Chapter IX - Special Beneficiary Classes 215
  • Chapter X - Health Service in Industry 241
  • Appendixes 277
  • Index 333
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