George Eliot and the Landscape of Time: Narrative Form and Protestant Apocalyptic History

By Mary Wilson Carpenter | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3

The Scheme of the Apocalypse

I

Although The Mill on the Floss preceded Romola by only two and a half years, these two fictions of women's lives at first glance appear very different.' The earlier novel is set in nineteenth‐ century England, the later in fifteenth-century Italy. The earlier novel ends abruptly with the death of the heroine, the later with the heroine's establishment in a women's community. Auto‐ biographical material and profoundly personal feeling permeate the earlier novel, while alien historical material and a sense of authorial distance characterize the later work, suggesting a level of abstraction akin to allegory. 2 These differences, however, do not preclude very striking similarities of apocalyptic structuring in the two novels: the later novel appears, in fact, to radically revise the septenary structure employed in the earlier.

As George Eliot's "apocalypse of history," the plot or "scheme" of Romola conceals a septenary structure, a sevenfold apocalyptic history of the world. The Mill on the Floss, however, is visibly divided into seven "books" with nonsequential chapter numbering between the books—a chapter arrangement that underlines the narrative's seven-part division. Narrative content in the relevant sections of the two novels suggests many parallels that are also reversals or mirror images, as in the double drownings at the conclusion of both narratives. A comparison of this parallel apocalyptic structuring suggests that in Maggie Tulliver's story George Eliot writes the "history of a witch" in seven books, a representation of feminine conflict that takes the form of a bitter parody of apocalyptic history, while in Romola she re-writes history as a sevenfold prophetic vision of "the woman clothed with the sun."

Apocalyptic structuring in The Mill on the Floss appears rela

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
George Eliot and the Landscape of Time: Narrative Form and Protestant Apocalyptic History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.