Messianism, Mysticism, and Magic: A Sociological Analysis of Jewish Religious Movements

By Stephen Sharot | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I wish to thank Bryan Wilson and Robert Liberles, who read the entire manuscript and gave me the benefit of their critical judgments and attention to details. Paul Flohr read chapter 5 in article form, and I am grateful for his comments. I was lucky to have a number of very good students who attended my graduate courses in the sociology of religion in the Hebrew University. I would like to mention two, in particular, who wrote excellent papers on Hasidism: Ilana Friedrich-Silber and Eva Gobey‐ Bogan. Another former student of mine, Rachel Kimor, was a superb research assistant. For financial support I would like to thank the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Hebrew University, for two small research grants.

I gathered some useful criticisms when I presented parts of the work in a number of forums: the Department of Behavioural Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev; the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Tel-Aviv University; the Department of Anthropology, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and the BSA Sociology of Religion Study Group.

I wrote a large part of the manuscript during a sabbatical year in the Department of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which provided a most congenial environment. Bruce Geyer, a graduate student in English literature, did an excellent job of typing the manuscript. In its final stage the manuscript benefited from the skillful editing by David Perry at the University of North Carolina Press.

Most of chapter 5 appeared in Comparative Studies in Society and History 22 (July 1980). Part of chapter 10 appeared in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 19 (December 1980).

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