Messianism, Mysticism, and Magic: A Sociological Analysis of Jewish Religious Movements

By Stephen Sharot | Go to book overview

13.

Religious Zionism
in Israel—A Return to
Messianism

Orthodoxy and Zionism

Prior to World War I the leading rabbis and zaddikim in eastern Europe perceived Zionism as a vehicle of secularization and a major enemy of Judaism. One of the major aims of Agudat Yisrael, founded in 1912, was to protect orthodoxy against Zionism. A religious Zionist movement, Mizrachi ("Spiritual Center"), was founded in 1902 as a faction of the World Zionist Organization, but it remained a small and marginal sector of the Zionist movement.

Religious Zionists had to cope with the conflicting pressures from traditionalist and secular groups, and their attempts to harmonize two world views created a number of paradoxes that they were unable to reconcile. They were attacked by anti-Zionist traditionalists, Hasidim and mitnagdim, who saw them either as Sabbatians, followers of a false messianic promise, or as maskilim who had surrendered to the falsehoods of modernity. They were accused of delaying the Redemption and of deviating from true messianism, which counseled a passive waiting for the messiah. The followers of Mizrachi adhered strictly to the Halachah, but the anti‐ Zionists, attempting to discredit them, cast doubt on their religious observance. At the same time, the religious Zionists had to withstand the pressures of the secular Zionists who wished to display to the world the rational components of a modern national movement. 1

These tensions were particularly acute in Palestine, where the traditionalists and the Zionists had fundamentally different conceptions of the Land of Israel. The traditionalists saw Israel as a holy land where everything had to be in conformity with the Halachah, and many orthodox Jews migrated to Palestine in the nineteenth century to escape the encroaching modernism of the West. The secular Zionists, on the other hand, saw settlement in the Land of Israel as an opportunity for the "normalization" of Jewish society. Exacerbated by competition over financial aid from the diaspora, the conflict reached its peak during the period of the second aliyah; the settlers of the second aliyah saw the Old Yishuv (Settlement) as representative of a deformed Jewish way of life, while the religious Jews

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Messianism, Mysticism, and Magic: A Sociological Analysis of Jewish Religious Movements
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.