Woodrow Wilson and a Revolutionary World, 1913-1921

By Arthur S. Link | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

The papers printed in this volume were originally presented at an international symposium at Princeton University from October 10 through October 12, 1979, which I arranged and the Woodrow Wilson Foundation sponsored. Commentaries were also read by Andrew J. Lindsay of the University of Oxford, Kendrick A. Clements of the University of South Carolina, John W Long of Rider College, Wilton B. Fowler of the University of Washington, Piotr S. Wandycz of Yale University, Marian Drozdowski of the University of Warsaw, Jacek R. Wedrowski of the Institute for the Study of Advanced Capitalist Economies, Warsaw, Klaus Schwabe of the Historical Institute, Aachen, John E. Reinertson of the Department of State, George W. Egerton, University of British Columbia, Lawrence E. Gelfand of the University of Iowa, André Kaspi of the University of Paris (the Sorbonne), Edward H. Buehrig of Indiana University, and Inis L. Claude, Jr., of the University of Virginia. In addition, most of the persons who are currently doing research and writing on the general theme of the conference, "Woodrow Wilson and a Revolutionary World," were also present and participated in lively discussions.

Wilson was the first President of the United States since Washington, Jefferson, and Madison to face a world torn by revolutions and world war. The papers in this volume make it clear that Wilson was the pivot of foreign policy in the twentieth century. For the United States, he laid down the guidelines for its foreign policy since 1921: antiimperialism, anticolonialism, self-determination, and the search for peace, world order, and some form of collective security. For the world, he set forth the agenda of international problems and goals that are still as important now as they were in his own day. The papers in this book, as I have said, not only illuminate these statements; they also give evidence of the enormous complexities, ambiguities, and difficulties that beset Wilson in his quest for a new liberal world order. Finally, they remind us that the effort to implement Wilson's ideals must still go on if humankind is to survive.

I express my sincere gratitude to the authors for their patience

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Woodrow Wilson and a Revolutionary World, 1913-1921
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 241

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.