Mirror and Veil: The Historical Dimension of Spenser's Faerie Queene

By Michael O'Connell | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Donatus's life of Vergil can be consulted in the Loeb Suetonius 2. 464-83.
2.
Poeticarum Libri Tres, 1. 208-9.
3.
See Adam Parry, "The Two Voices of Virgil's Aeneid," and Kenneth Quinn, Virgil's Aeneid, pp. 51-58.
4.
Although an extremely useful critical term, mode is seldom defined. In "Mode in Narrative Poetry," a lecture given at the Clark Library of UCLA, Paul Alpers made some acute suggestions about mode: "Critics resort to this term and use it in crucial places because it uniquely fuses formal and thematic considerations. It is the term to use when we want to suggest that the ethos of a work informs its technique and that techniques imply an ethos." He suggests this definition: "mode is the literary manifestation, in a given work, of the writer's and the putative reader's assumptions about man's nature and situation." I would amend his phrase "in a given work" to "in a given part of a literary work," for mode seems to me a flexible element in a complex narrative; a change of narrative perspective may signal important changes in the way a reader is to view man's nature and situation. Spenser gains much of his moral complexity, I believe, from variations, sometimes quite subtle, in mode.
5.
Roy C. Strong, Portraits of Queen Elizabeth I, p. 82, pl. 21.
6.
Ibid., pp. 75-76, 84-86, 102-5, 124-25; pl. 13, 15, 17.
7.
An interesting discussion of this aspect of the Calender is to be found in Nancy Hoffman's dissertation, "The Landscape of Man," pp. 177-216. Paul E. McLane, in Spenser's Shepheardes Calender, identifies most (but not all) of the clerics to whom Spenser alludes in the ecclesiastical eclogues, but his study suffers from a naive understanding of Renaissance allegory and presents an unconvincing in- terpretation of the whole of the Calender.
8.
William Pierce, ed., The Marprelate Tracts, pp. 42, 82, 170, passim. See also Dictionary of National Biography, s.v. "Perne, Andrew," and Harvey's "testimonial" of Peme in a letter to Spenser, in Variorum, 9:462.
9.
That prototype was Richard Davies, the much-abused bishop of the Welsh diocese of St. David's. See McLane, Calender, pp. 216-34.
10.
Variorum, 1:264.
11.
Studies in Spenser's Historical Allegory, pp. 59-103.
12.
See especially Source and Meaning, pp. 200-27. In a provocative attempt to reopen the question of history in The Faerie Queene, Frank Kermode also insisted upon the term historical allegory in "Spenser and the Allegorists" and in "The Faerie Queene, 1 and 5."
13.
The Structure of Allegory in The Faerie Queene, pp. 9-10.
14.
Imagination and Power, p. 58.

-195-

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Mirror and Veil: The Historical Dimension of Spenser's Faerie Queene
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Mirror and Veil - The Historical Dimension of Spenser's Faerie Queene *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Explanatory Note xiii
  • Mirror and Veil *
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1 - The Method of the Poet His Torical 16
  • Chapter 2 - Holiness and Historical Fulfillment 38
  • Chapter 3 - History and the Poet's Golden World 69
  • Chapter 4 - Mirrors More Than One 99
  • Chapter 5 - Myth and History in the Legend of Justice 125
  • Chapter 6 - The Return to Pastoral Vision 161
  • Epilogue - Escape from Mutability 190
  • Notes 195
  • Works Cited 207
  • Index to the Faerie Queene 213
  • General Index 217
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