On Becoming a Rock Musician

By H. Stith Bennett | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1
Among other methodological strategies, I subscribe to the practice of seeking out negative cases; occurrences that would be impossible if my analysis is correct. Discovering several of these has changed my way of constructing analytic statements. Statements which will, in the wake of Karl Popper, never be proven, but which have not yet been disproven.
2
For an excellent introduction to this way of understanding sound and a de- velopment of the idea of soundscapes, see Murray Schafer's The Tuning of the World (Knopf, 1978).
3
See John Cage's Silence (M.I.T. Press, 1966), which contains his The Future of Music: Credo from 1937.

I Group Dynamics
1
Consider, for example, the Guitar Institute of Technology, 5858 Hollywood Boulevard, Hollywood, California, 90028; or The Rhythm Section Lab, 130 West 42nd Street, Suite 948, New York, New York, 10036.
2
This is a famous phrase in sociological circles. It was contributed by W. I. Thomas in his The Child in America: Behavior Problems and Programs, (Knopf, 1928).
3
This is also W. I. Thomas talk. It is a preliminary statement of the "reality con- structionist" approach to social life—to which I certainly subscribe. The standard introduction to this point of view is The Social Construction of Real- ity by Peter Berger and Thomas Luckmann (Doubleday, 1966).
4
For surveys of this type of philosophizing see Monroe Beardsley's Aesthetics: From Classical Greece to Present (Macmil lan, 1966); or George Dickie's Aes- thetics : An Introduction (Irvington Press, 1971).
5
See William Weber's Music and the Middle Class (Holmes and Meter, 1975).
6
This is from Howard S. Becker's Art Worlds (University of California Press, 1980).

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
On Becoming a Rock Musician
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • On Becoming a Rock Musician *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • I - Group Dynamics *
  • Introduction *
  • Group Definition and Redefinition *
  • II - Rock Ecology *
  • Instruments and "The Outside World" *
  • Equipment and the Band Van *
  • Gigs *
  • III - Mastering the Technological Component *
  • Technology and the Music *
  • The Realities of Practice *
  • IV - Performance: Aesthetics and the Technological Imperative *
  • Playing *
  • "Other People's Music" *
  • Appendix *
  • Loudness and Equalization *
  • Notes *
  • A Guide for the Reader *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.