A Nation Transformed by Information: How Information Has Shaped the United States from Colonial Times to the Present

By Alfred D. Chandler Jr.; James W. Cortada | Go to book overview

Contributors

Richard D. Brown is Professor of History at the University of Connecticut. He is the author of Modernization: The Transformation of American Life (Hill & Wang, 1976); Knowledge Is Power: The Diffusion of Information in Early America, 1650-1865 (Oxford University Press, I989); and The Strength of a People: The Idea of An Informed Citizenry in America, 1650-1870 (University of North Carolina Press, 1996). Brown works on the social and cultural history of early America. He is presently writing a microhistory of an incest-rape case during the early American Republic.

Alfred D. Chandler Jr. is the Strauss Professor of Business History, Emeritus, at the Graduate School of Business Administration, Harvard University. He is the author of Strategy and Structure (MIT Press, I962), The Visible Hand (Harvard University Press, 1977), Scale and Scope (Harvard University Press, 1990), and other volumes. He has won many prizes, including the Pulitzer and Bancroft Prizes. Chandler is currently studying the way industries have acquired and leveraged their knowledge for strategic and competitive successes.

James W. Cortada is an Executive Consultant with IBM Global Services. He is the author of a number of books on the management and history of information technology. Some of his more recent publications include Before the Computer: IBM, NCR, Burroughs, and Remington Rand and the Industry They Created, 1865-1956 (Princeton University Press, 1993), The Computer in the United States (M. E. Sharpe, 1993), and Best Practices in Information Technology (Prentice‐ Hall, 1998), and, with Thomas S. Hargraves and Edward Wakin, Into the Networked Age: How IBM and Other Firms are Getting There Now (Oxford University Press, 1999). His primary area of historical research is on how businesses used information processing.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Nation Transformed by Information: How Information Has Shaped the United States from Colonial Times to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 380

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.