Neither Saints nor Sinners: Writing the Lives of Women in Spanish America

By Kathleen Ann Myers | Go to book overview

Appendix F
Catalina de Erauso: Selections from Vida i sucesos

From Madres del verbo/Mothers of the Word: Early Spanish American Women Writers, ed. and trans. Nina M. Scott (Alburquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1999), pp. 35–49.


Chapter 1. Her homeland, parents, birth, education, flight, and journeys
throughout various parts of Spain

I, Doña Catalina de Erauso, was born in the town of San Sebastián, in Guipúzcoa, in the year 1585, the daughter of Captain Don Miguel de Erauso and of Doña María Pérez de Galarraga y Arce, natives and residents of that town. My parents brought me up at home with my other siblings until I was four years old. In 1589 they put me in the convent of San Sebastián el Antiguo, in said town, which belongs to Dominican nuns, with my aunt Doña Ursula de Unzá y Sarasti, my mother's cousin and the abbess of that convent; there I was raised until I was fifteen, when the matter of my profession came up.

When I was almost at the end of my year of the novitiate, I had a quarrel with a professed nun named Doña Catalina de Aliri who, being a widow, had professed and entered the convent. She was strong and I but a girl; she slapped me, and I resented it. On the night of March 18, 1600, the eve of St. Joseph, the convent arose at midnight for Matins. I went into the choir and found my aunt kneeling there; she called me over, gave me the key to her cell, and told me to bring her prayer book. I went to get it. I unlocked [the cell] and took it, and, seeing all the keys to the convent hanging from a nail, I left the cell open and gave my aunt her key and the prayer book. The nuns were already in the choir and had solemnly begun Matins; at the first lesson I went up to my aunt and asked her permission to withdraw, as I was feeling ill. My aunt put her hand to my forehead and said, “Go lie down. ” I left the choir, took a lamp, and went to my aunt's cell; there I took a pair of scissors, thread, and a needle; I took some coins (reales de a ocho) that were lying there and took the convent keys and left. I went along opening doors and shutting them behind me, and at the final one left my scapulary and went out into the street, which I had never seen, with no idea which way to turn or where to go. I don't remember where I went, but I came on a stand of chestnut trees that was outside [of town] but close behind the convent. There I hid, and spent three days designing, fitting, and cutting out clothes. I made myself a pair of breeches from a blue cloth petticoat I was wearing, and from an underskirt of coarse green wool, a sleeved doublet and leggings; I left

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Neither Saints nor Sinners: Writing the Lives of Women in Spanish America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.