Managing the Risk of Workplace Stress

By Sharon Clarke; Cary L. Cooper | Go to book overview

Chapter 9

Risk reduction

This chapter discusses how organisations can use the information gained from the stress audit and risk evaluation stages of the risk management approach, including an overview of past stress interventions. The final stage involves the implementation and monitoring of stress prevention and reduction measures. There is substantial evidence to suggest that many stress reduction programmes, such as employee assistance programmes (EAPs), are very effective in mitigating the symptoms of stress (Cooper and Sadri 1991; Berridge et al. 1997; Highley-Marchington and Cooper 1998). However, much of the evidence is focused on tertiary measures, which are aimed at individuals who display stress-related symptoms, such as stress counselling. Cox et al. (2000) recommend that an intervention package could include tertiary action, but that measures should also be implemented at primary and secondary levels (i.e., should involve preventative action). A description of the levels of stress intervention is presented in Box 9.1.

However, reviews of stress intervention programmes (Burke 1993; Cooper and Payne 1988; Cox 1993; International Labour Organisation 1992; Kahn and Byosiere 1992; Karasek 1992) suggest that such programmes frequently fail to emphasise prevention at the source.

Due to the structure of health care costs, there has been a strong financial incentive for US employers to introduce stress prevention programmes. The focus of the programmes is the prevention of individual ill-health, thus they tend to emphasise the health-related behaviour of workers in relation to specific health problems. There is little impetus for US companies to introduce programmes that include worker participation or changes to the work environment. There are differences in Europe, where preventative action is more

-150-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Managing the Risk of Workplace Stress
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.