No Way of Knowing: Crime, Urban Legends, and the Internet

By Pamela Donovan | Go to book overview

Bibliography
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Allport, Floyd and Milton Lepkin. 1945. “Wartime Rumors of Waste and Special Privilege: Why Some People Believe Them. ” Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology 40, 3-36.
Allport, Gordon and Leo Postman. 1947. The Psychology of Rumor. New York: Henry Holt.
Altheide, David. 1997. “The News Media, the Problem Frame, and the Production of Fear. ” Sociological Quarterly 38:4, 647-668.
Arendt, Hannah. 1973. The Origins of Totalitarianism. New York: Harcourt Brace.
Associated Press. 1976. “Morganthau finds Film Dismembering a Hoax. ” New York Times, March 10, p. A1.
Associated Press. 1999a. “Serial Killer Sentenced to Death for Crime Spree. ” June 30.
Associated Press. 1999b. “UC Berkeley Researchers Human Organs Center Will Act as Organ Police. ” November 7.
Baer, Will Christopher. 1998. Kiss Me, Judas. New York: Viking.
Bailey, Ronald. 1990. “Behind the Baby Parts Story. ” Forbes, v. 145, May 28, p. 372.
Barlay, Stephan. 1977. Sexual Slavery. New York: Ballantine.
Barraclough, Jenny. 1996. “Whose Pound of Flesh?” The Observer (London), May 19, R8.
Barry, John. 1995. “Too Good to Check. ” Newsweek v 125, June 26, p 33.
Barry, Kathleen. 1979. Female Sexual Slavery. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
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No Way of Knowing: Crime, Urban Legends, and the Internet
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - The Market in Snuff Films 27
  • Chapter Three - Stolen Body Parts 61
  • Chapter Four - Shopping Mall and Theme Park Abduction Legends 85
  • Chapter Five - Debunkers and Their Orbit 111
  • Chapter Six - Crime Legends and the Role of Belief 133
  • Chapter Seven - Crime Legends, Protection, and Fear 157
  • Chapter Eight - A Summary 189
  • Appendix 1 197
  • Appendix 2 201
  • Notes 203
  • Bibliography 217
  • Index 229
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