King James IV of Scotland: A Brief Survey of His Life and Times

By R. L. Mackie | Go to book overview

VII
HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS

T HE troubles in the Western Isles were far from finished when James left them, apparently reduced to his obedience, in the summer of 1495. Before another twelvemonth had passed, Bute was devastated by a body of Islesmen. The government tried to secure the co-operation of the Island chiefs in the maintenance of order: on 3 October 1496 the Council declared that any summons issued before 26 April 1497 against any person dwelling in the Lordship of the Isles was to be accepted and executed by the chief of his clan. If the chief failed to execute the summons, proceedings would be taken against him as if he were "the principale party defendour" in the case.1 On the same day the Council set on record that in the presence of Argyll five of the chiefs--MacLean of Duart, MacIan of Ardnamurchan, Allan MacRuari of Moidart, Ewen Allan, son of Lochiel, and Donald Angus, son of Keppoch--"be the extensione of thare handis" had promised, under a penalty of five hundred pounds, to refrain from inflicting scaith on one another.2

Of the two possible claimants to the Lordship of the Isles, one, Donald Owre, the grandson of John of the Isles, had been for some years in the King's service. In 1494 foodstuffs had been delivered to him for the provisioning of the castle at Tarbert,3 and the Treasurer's Accounts record money payments made to him and his servants in the three following years.4 The other, Alexander of Lochalsh, made a second attempt at rebellion. He invaded Ross, apparently in 1497, but was defeated by the Munroes and Mackenzies at Drumchatt, and compelled to return to the Isles. Soon afterwards, while attempting to organise

____________________
1
Acts of the Lords of Council in Civil Causes, VOL. II, p. 41.
2
Ibid.
3
C.T.S., VOL. I, p. 244.
4
C.T.S., VOL. I, pp. 273, 342, 380, 381.

-188-

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King James IV of Scotland: A Brief Survey of His Life and Times
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Short List of Abbreviations xiv
  • I - Prelude: The Scotland of James III 1
  • II - Apprenticeship 1488-1493 45
  • III - The Isles and England 72
  • IV - The Thistle and the Rose 1498-1503 90
  • V - Scotland in 1503 113
  • VI - Religious Life 153
  • VII - Highlands and Islands 188
  • VIII - The Road to Flodden 200
  • IX - The Eve of Flodden 226
  • X - Flodden 246
  • XI - Salvage from the Wreck 270
  • Index 289
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