Shinto, a Short History

By Ito Satoshi; Endo Jun et al. | Go to book overview

3

THE EARLY MODERN PERIOD

In search of a Shinto identity

Endō Jun

It was in the early modern period (1600-1867) that the outline of Shinto as we know it today came into focus. From the perspective of the religious system, we have already seen that Shinto of the middle ages was indistinguishable from Buddhism in terms of constituents, network and substance. In the early modern period, however, Shinto gradually re-defines itself in contradistinction to Buddhism. It is not that both existed as separate religions; rather they coexisted, each necessitating the other. Bitō Masahide has defined that coexistence by saying that Shinto, Buddhism and folk religions merged and adopted the form of a ‘national creed’. 1 He points out, for example, that it was in the early modern period that all sorts of religious elements, Shinto, Buddhist and many more besides, began to intermingle; the ritual cycle of contemporary Japan proves to be a legacy of this early modern period.

Let us turn our attention to the different dimensions of the religious system. It was Yoshida Shinto that set the direction of what we have called the network of early modern Shinto. In place of the now-defunct shrine system of ancient Japan, the Yoshida family, after its own fashion, began to organise shrines and priests across the length and breadth of Japan. This reorganisation by the Yoshida became, with the support of the Edo bakufu, the foundation of the early modern shrine system. Now, for the first time, local shrines of medium to small size, as well as peripheral religious practitioners, were all incorporated into a single national structure. Again, the early modern network was characterised by the formation of religious groupings transcending locality and status. This period witnessed the formation of , religious confraternities affiliated to sacred mountains or famous temples and shrines. The people who affiliated themselves to these were linked to the mountains and temples through the intermediary of religionists such as oshi and, as a result, these confraternities themselves

-108-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shinto, a Short History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Translators' Introduction ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Ancient and Classical Japan 12
  • 2 - The Medieval Period 63
  • Notes 102
  • 3 - The Early Modern Period 108
  • 4 - The Modern Age 159
  • Selected Reading 198
  • Index 204
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.