England and the Orleans Monarchy

By Major John Hall | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
THE ISOLATION OF FRANCE

HENRY BULWER,1 who during the absence of Lord Granville from Paris was in charge of the embassy, was agreeably surprised at the calmness with which M. Thiers received the news of the conclusion of the treaty. At their first interview, after the arrival of Guizot',s despatch, be contented himself with expressing a pained astonishment that England should have treated her ally with so little consideration. The affair would, he feared, arouse the greatest indignation throughout the country and, for the present, he must beg him to observe the strictest secrecy about it.2 A few days later, in the course of a long and confidential conversation with Louis Philippe, Bulwer was enabled to judge of the King's opinion of the situation. Adopting the contention, which Thiers; was instructing Guizot to urge in his conferences with Palmerston, that no definite proposals for settling the eastern question had ever been made to the French government, Louis Philippe complained of the secret manner in which the treaty had been negotiated. " Ah, Mr. Bulwer," said he, "I know you wished to read me a lesson, I know it, but it may be a perilous one for all parties." Assuming a more confidential tone, the King then proceeded to explain the difficulties by

____________________
1
He had been transferred from Constantinople to Paris as secretary of embassy in 1889.
2
H. Bulwer, Life of Palmerston, II. P. 315. Levant correspondence, Bulwer to Palmerston, July 20, 1840

-279-

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