The Birth of the Irish Free State, 1921-1923

By Joseph M. Curran | Go to book overview
Contents
Preface vii
Acknowledgments viii
1 The Seedbed of Revolution: 1890-1914 And Always Ireland. The Nationalist Revival. Home Rule and Ulster 1
2 Ireland Transformed: 1914-1918 The Easter Rising: Background, Progress, and Reactions. The Growth of Separatism. General Election 9
3 The Struggle for Independence: 1919-1920 Establishing the Republic. Britain's Response. Michael Collins. Terror and Counterterror. Abortive Peace Moves. De Valera in America 23
4 The Last Phase: January—June 1921 A Small War. Demands for Peace. The Culmination of Coercion. Britain's Peace Initiative. The Truce 47
5 Preliminary Negotiations: July-October 1921 The Lloyd George-de Valera Meetings. Maneuvering for Position. Background of the Peace Conference 64
6 The First Stage of the Conference: October 11November 3, 1921 Personal Relationships. Plenary Sessions. Subconferences Begin. Exchange of Proposals. Narrowing the Gap 81
7 Advance and Retreat: November 1921 Deadlock over Ulster. A Shift in Tactics and Griffith's Pledge. Stalemate on the Crown. British Concessions 99
8 The Final Rounds: December 1-6, 1921 The Irish Cabinet Meeting of December 3. The Imbroglio of December 4. Retying the Threads. The Fateful Subconference. Agreement 116
9 The Treaty: Reflections and Reactions Substance and Symbolism. Partition. Alternatives. British and Irish Unionist Reactions. Nationalist Ireland 132
10 Dail Eireann and the Treaty: December 1921January 1922 First Stage of the Debate. Recess. Conclusion. Epilogue 147

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