The Birth of the Irish Free State, 1921-1923

By Joseph M. Curran | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Credit for this book, although not blame for any of its shortcomings, must be shared with many people, some of whose contributions deserve explicit recognition. Grants from the Faculty Research Committee of Le Moyne College greatly facilitated my work. I also should like to thank for their assistance the staffs of the Public Record Office (London), the Beaverbrook Library (London), the Special Collections Division of the University of Birmingham Library, the Archives of University College, Dublin, and, most of all, the National Library of Ireland. Almost all the Irishmen whom I interviewed about the events described in this volume are now dead, but the history that they made, they brought to life for me, and I can only hope that I have been able to transmit some of that vitality to the reader. The late Charles Loch Mowat, my mentor in graduate school at the University of Chicago, first aroused my interest in Irish history, and I will be grateful always for his inspiration. Professor Kevin B. Nowlan of University College, Dublin helped me to obtain access to the rich collection of General Richard Mulcahy's papers. Professor Thomas E. Hachey of Marquette University read my manuscript and made several useful suggestions. Mrs. Joyce Bell did a superb job typing it. Over many years, Alf MacLochlainn, Director of the National Library of Ireland, has proved himself the best of friends as well as the most helpful of guides. Finally, I am most deeply indebted to Professor Lawrence J. McCaffrey of Loyola University, Chicago. Like many others in the field of Irish studies, I have benefited immensely from his encouragement and advice. If this book has a patron, it is surely he.

JOSEPH M. CURRAN
Syracuse, New York

For permission to quote from various documents, the following acknowledg‐ ments are due:

The Controller of H. M. Stationery Office for extracts from Crown-copyright material in the Public Record Office, London (Records of the Cabinet Office).

The Keeper of State Papers for extracts from documents relating to the Anglo-Irish Treaty negotiations of 1921 in the State Paper Office, Dublin Castle (Dail Eireann files, DE 2/304).

The First Beaverbrook Foundation for extracts from the Lloyd George papers.

The Sub-Librarian, Special Collections Division, University of Birmingham Library for extracts from the Austen Chamberlain papers.

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