The Birth of the Irish Free State, 1921-1923

By Joseph M. Curran | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1.
On the labor movement and the Citizen Army, see Lawrence J. McCaf- frey, The Irish Question, 1800-1922 (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1968), 143-45; J. W. Boyle, "Connolly, the Citizen Army and the Rising," in The Making of 1916: Studies in the History of the Rising, ed. Kevin D. Nowlan (Dublin: The Stationery Office, 1969), 51-68; Donal Nevin, "The Irish Citizen Army," in 1916: The Easter Rising, ed. Owen Dudley Edwards and Fergus Pyle (London: MacGibbon and Kee, 1968), 119-31.
2.
On Griffith and Sinn Fein, see Padraic Colum, Arthur Griffith (Dublin: Browne and Nolan, 1959), pt. I, chs. 6-15; P. S. O'Hegarty, A History of Ireland under the Union, 1801-1922 (London: Methuen, 1952), chs. 60-63, and The Victory of Sinn Fein (Dublin: Talbot Press, 1924), 30-31, 130-34; Robert Brennan, Allegiance (Dublin: Browne and Nolan, 1950), 216-17; and Donal McCartney, "The Sinn Fein Movement," in The Making of 1916, 31-48.
3.
The IRB was organized in Circles, Counties or Districts, and Divisions; an elected Center headed each unit and served as the link with other units. The Brotherhood's ruling body was the Supreme Council in Dublin, which included Division Centers and four members coopted by them. The Council's Executive consisted of a president, secretary, and treasurer elected by Council members. Under its constitution, the IRB was "the sole government of the Irish Republic," and its president or head center was president of the Republic. Every member owed unquestioning obedience to the Supreme Council, whose policy and deci- sions were regularly reported to the leadership of the Clan na Gael. On the IRB, see O'Hegarty, History of Ireland, chs. 32-36 and pp. 595-96, 633-34, 656. F. S. L. Lyons, Ireland since the Famine (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1971), 114- 23, 151-56, 313-17; Robert Kee, The Green Flag (New York, Delacorte Press, 1972), 308-10; Diarmuid Lynch, The I.R.B. and the 1916 Insurrection (Cork: Mer- cier Press, 1957), ed. Florence O'Donoghue, 22, 33; Bulmer Hobson, Ireland Yesterday and Tomorrow (Tralee: Anvil Books, 1968), 31-39, 103-7.
4.
On Unionists and Home Rule, see Patrick Buckland, Irish Unionism: One: The Anglo-Irish and the New Ireland, 1885-1922 (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1972), introduction and ch. 1, and Irish Unionism: Two: Ulster Unionism and the Origins of Northern Ireland, 1886-1922 (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1973), intro- duction and chs. 1-4; Robert Blake, The Unknown Prime Minister: The Life and Times of Andrew Bonar Law, 1858-1923 (London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1955), chs. 7-14; Denis Gwynn, The History of Partition (1912-1925) (Dublin: Browne and Nolan, 1950), 42-43; Nicholas Mansergh, "The Unionist Party and the Union, 1886-1916," in 1916: The Easter Rising, 79-89; J. C. Beckett, "Carson— Unionist and Rebel," in Leaders and Men of the Easter Rising, Dublin 1916, ed. F. X. Martin (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1967), 81-93.
5.
Blake, 130.

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