The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2

By Cathal J. Nolan | Go to book overview

Suggested Readings:
Annual and thematic reports by Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and other widely respected NGOs. On the international legal evolution and foreign policy implications of human rights issues see Louis Henkin, The Age of Rights (1990); Paul G. Lauren, The Evolution of International Human Rights (1998); Hersh Lauterpacht, International Law and Human Rights (1968); David Newsom, The Diplomacy of Human Rights (1986); Cathal J. Nolan, Principled Diplomacy (1993); R. J. Vincent, Human Rights and International Relations (1986).
humint. Human intelligence. Any and all information secretly gathered from people, whether agents or informers. It is generally easier to provide disinformation through humint than elint or sigint. Hence, there is commonly a division within the intelligence community over humint. At the extremes, it is seen as either unreliable to the point of being useless or the most vital and incisive form of intelligence, when accurate. During the Cold War the Soviet Union made great use of humint because its primary target states in the West were open societies. The Western powers found it much harder to penetrate the Soviet Union with agents and turned instead to the areas where they excelled: sigint and other high-technology methods.
Hundred Days. (1) Europe (February 26–June 22, 1815): A frantic period marking Napoleon’s return from exile, reclamation of the title “Emperor,” a rallying of the army for one last effort to enforce more favorable peace terms, clumsy invasion of Belgium, defeat at Waterloo on June 18, 1815, and second abdication four days later. Although there was no chance that representatives of the Quadruple Alliance gathered at the Congress of Vienna would have allowed him to remount an imperial throne, the episode reminded all of the importance of Great Britain in continental affairs, of the definitive arrival of Prussia as a Great Power, and of the mutual need of the major powers to cooperate vis-à-vis France. It thus reinforced a determination to surround France with a cordon sanitaire of buffer states. (2) China (June 11–September 21, 1898): The Guangxu emperor issued 40 decrees that aimed at full modernization of the Qing dynasty and Chinese state. However, the Dowager Empress Cixi launched a palace coup to cut these short, confined the emperor to a corner of the Forbidden City, and executed the reformers. (3) United States (March–June 1933): Franklin Roosevelt passed 15 major pieces of social and economic legislation constituting much of the New Deal. Ever since, a silly political fetish has existed among American journalists (and some new administrations) under which major legislation is supposed to be passed within

-743-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • F 530
  • Suggested Reading: 534
  • Suggested Readings: 547
  • Suggested Reading: 548
  • Suggested Reading: 557
  • Suggested Readings: 571
  • Suggested Readings: 572
  • Suggested Reading: 573
  • Suggested Reading: 582
  • Suggested Readings: 583
  • Suggested Readings: 584
  • Suggested Readings: 590
  • Suggested Readings: 591
  • G 601
  • Suggested Reading: 604
  • Suggested Reading: 618
  • Suggested Readings: 624
  • Suggested Reading: 625
  • Suggested Reading: 636
  • Suggested Readings: 638
  • Suggested Readings: 645
  • Suggested Reading: 650
  • Suggested Readings: 651
  • Suggested Readings: 653
  • Suggested Reading: 655
  • Suggested Readings: 657
  • Suggested Reading: 662
  • Suggested Reading: 665
  • Suggested Reading: 668
  • Suggested Readings: 671
  • Suggested Readings: 675
  • Suggested Readings: 677
  • Suggested Readings: 678
  • H 681
  • Suggested Readings: 685
  • Suggested Readings: 687
  • Suggested Reading: 688
  • Suggested Reading: 691
  • Suggested Reading: 692
  • Suggested Reading: 694
  • Suggested Readings: 711
  • Suggested Readings: 712
  • Suggested Readings: 713
  • Suggested Readings: 716
  • Suggested Reading: 722
  • Suggested Readings: 723
  • Suggested Readings: 725
  • Suggested Readings: 728
  • Suggested Reading: 731
  • Suggested Readings: 743
  • Suggested Readings: 744
  • Suggested Readings: 750
  • Suggested Reading: 751
  • I 752
  • Suggested Readings: 761
  • Suggested Reading: 773
  • Suggested Readings: 774
  • Suggested Readings: 777
  • Suggested Reading: 781
  • Suggested Readings: 785
  • Suggested Readings: 792
  • Suggested Readings: 795
  • Suggested Readings: 800
  • Suggested Readings: 801
  • Suggested Readings: 805
  • Suggested Readings: 813
  • Suggested Readings: 821
  • Suggested Readings: 825
  • Suggested Reading: 826
  • Suggested Readings: 828
  • Suggested Readings: 833
  • Suggested Readings: 836
  • Suggested Readings: 839
  • Suggested Reading: 843
  • Suggested Readings: 844
  • J 846
  • Suggested Readings: 847
  • Suggested Readings: 872
  • Suggested Reading: 874
  • K 884
  • Suggested Readings: 892
  • Suggested Readings: 895
  • Suggested Readings: 896
  • Suggested Reading: 898
  • Suggested Reading: 900
  • Suggested Readings: 904
  • Suggested Reading: 913
  • Suggested Readings: 914
  • Suggested Readings: 916
  • Suggested Readings: 917
  • Suggested Readings: 925
  • L 927
  • Suggested Readings: 934
  • Suggested Reading: 935
  • Suggested Readings: 938
  • Suggested Reading: 952
  • Suggested Readings: 957
  • Suggested Reading: 963
  • Suggested Readings: 966
  • Suggested Readings: 973
  • Suggested Readings: 979
  • Suggested Readings: 985
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 986

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.