The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2

By Cathal J. Nolan | Go to book overview

Suggested Readings:
Geoffrey Conrad and Arthur Demarest, Religion and Empire (1984); Richard Keatinge, ed., Peruvian Prehistory (1988); Thomas C. Patterson, The Inca Empire (1991).
incendiary weapons. Weapons that involve destruction with fire. Perhaps the first incendiary was the Greek fire used by Athens against the Persian Navy more than 2,000 years ago. In the Middle Ages, burning oils were pumped through pipes or poured over walls on attacking soldiers. African and American native troops used flaming arrows against fortifications or villages. Any urban guerrilla or partisan can make a Molotov cocktail, whereas better-equipped troops and tanks have sported flamethrowers. Thermit was widely employed in bombs and shells in the latter half of the twentieth century, and napalm proved an all-purpose incendiary.
Inchon, Battle of (September 15, 1950). Trapped in the Pusan pocket, United Nations and South Korean forces during the first months of the Korean Conflict were in desperate straits. As the fighting stabilized in September, MacArthur conceived of a daring plan: an amphibious landing behind the North Korean lines, at Inchon. The bay at Inchon had 30-foot tides, and the landing was in fact something of a desperate gamble. Mao actually anticipated the decision to attack at Inchon and warned Kim Il Sung of this possibility. The warning was ignored, however, and when the Americans landed the

North Koreans were cut off and routed in their turn. The victory was so complete that MacArthur began to dream of liberating North Korea by force. His subsequent march to the Yalu provoked a massive Chinese intervention that turned Korea into a much more bloody, and longer, war with China.

-761-

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The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • F 530
  • Suggested Reading: 534
  • Suggested Readings: 547
  • Suggested Reading: 548
  • Suggested Reading: 557
  • Suggested Readings: 571
  • Suggested Readings: 572
  • Suggested Reading: 573
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  • Suggested Readings: 590
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  • G 601
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  • Suggested Reading: 636
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  • H 681
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  • I 752
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  • J 846
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  • K 884
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  • L 927
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