The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2

By Cathal J. Nolan | Go to book overview

Suggested Readings:
Hedley Bull, ed., Intervention in World Politics (1984) R. J. Vincent, Nonintervention and International Order (1974).
interwar years. In Asia, 1919–1937 for China and Japan, 1919–1941 for the rest; in Europe, 1919–1939; for the United States, 1919–1941. See also World War I; World War II.

Suggested Reading:
Sally Marks, Illusion of Peace (1976).
Intifada. The term, meaning “shivering” or “shaking,” was first used by Arabs who rejected Jewish settlement in Palestine in the 1920s and 1930s. In 1988 it was revived to refer to an uprising against Israeli control of the occupied territories. The uprising began spontaneously among the young in Gaza and the West Bank toward the end of 1987. Comprised at first mainly of jeers and stone throwing, it was quickly organized in secret by a range of radical Palestinians, including Hamas, who viewed the Palestine Liberation Organization as too cautious and accommodationist. As stones were exchanged for knives and a few guns, Israel responded with deliberate, retaliatory violence: many hundreds of Palestinians were killed by the Israeli Army, including scores of children; thousands more were seriously injured. In turn, the Intifada spread into Israel proper, with killings of and by Jewish civilians. Intifada leaders also targeted Palestinians, killing those identified, correctly or not, as collaborators with Israel. The Intifada ruined the economy in Gaza and the West Bank as Israel closed its borders to migrant workers, but it worked in making the occupied territories ungovernable by Israel, and thus succeeded in its less radical ambitions: by 1992 most Israelis were convinced of the need to trade land for peace. However, the more radical Palestinian leaders—those who still sought the ultimate destruction of Israel, rather than any political

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The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • F 530
  • Suggested Reading: 534
  • Suggested Readings: 547
  • Suggested Reading: 548
  • Suggested Reading: 557
  • Suggested Readings: 571
  • Suggested Readings: 572
  • Suggested Reading: 573
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  • Suggested Readings: 591
  • G 601
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  • H 681
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  • I 752
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  • J 846
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  • K 884
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  • L 927
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