The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2

By Cathal J. Nolan | Go to book overview

J
Jackson, Andrew (1767–1845). “Old Hickory.” U.S. frontier general; Democratic president, 1829–1837. As a boy, he was severely wounded in a skirmish during the American Revolution, by a saber cut from a British officer whose boots—or so legend has it—he refused to shine. The loss of a brother and his mother during that war added to his lifelong hatred of England. Elected to Congress in 1796, he fiercely opposed any reconciliation with England and called for war against the Indian tribes along the frontier. He was briefly the representative of Tennessee in the House of Representatives, 1796–1798. He may have backed Aaron Burr’s complex and possibly—the facts are still not clear—treasonous scheme for a vast empire in the American interior. That cost Jackson appointed office when the Louisiana Purchase by Jefferson made such an empire a reality, only as a great hinterland attached to the United States. He was made a general at the start of the War of 1812, during which he forcibly cleared (or “ethnically cleansed”) the Indian tribes of Alabama and Georgia, allies and neutrals along with pro-British Indians. (Jackson rarely distinguished among Indian tribes, preferring to despise and repress all equally.) He commanded at the strategically futile Battle of NewOrleans. After the war, Jackson returned to Indian fighting. He led the conquest of the Seminoles, nearly causing a major confrontation with Britain and Spain in the process, and completed pacification of the Floridas, 1817–1818. That led to the Adams-Onis Treaty (1819). He was narrowly defeated for president in 1824; John Quincy Adams emerged the victor in an election ultimately decided in the House of Representatives. However, Jackson defeated Adams in a landslide in 1828.

-846-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • F 530
  • Suggested Reading: 534
  • Suggested Readings: 547
  • Suggested Reading: 548
  • Suggested Reading: 557
  • Suggested Readings: 571
  • Suggested Readings: 572
  • Suggested Reading: 573
  • Suggested Reading: 582
  • Suggested Readings: 583
  • Suggested Readings: 584
  • Suggested Readings: 590
  • Suggested Readings: 591
  • G 601
  • Suggested Reading: 604
  • Suggested Reading: 618
  • Suggested Readings: 624
  • Suggested Reading: 625
  • Suggested Reading: 636
  • Suggested Readings: 638
  • Suggested Readings: 645
  • Suggested Reading: 650
  • Suggested Readings: 651
  • Suggested Readings: 653
  • Suggested Reading: 655
  • Suggested Readings: 657
  • Suggested Reading: 662
  • Suggested Reading: 665
  • Suggested Reading: 668
  • Suggested Readings: 671
  • Suggested Readings: 675
  • Suggested Readings: 677
  • Suggested Readings: 678
  • H 681
  • Suggested Readings: 685
  • Suggested Readings: 687
  • Suggested Reading: 688
  • Suggested Reading: 691
  • Suggested Reading: 692
  • Suggested Reading: 694
  • Suggested Readings: 711
  • Suggested Readings: 712
  • Suggested Readings: 713
  • Suggested Readings: 716
  • Suggested Reading: 722
  • Suggested Readings: 723
  • Suggested Readings: 725
  • Suggested Readings: 728
  • Suggested Reading: 731
  • Suggested Readings: 743
  • Suggested Readings: 744
  • Suggested Readings: 750
  • Suggested Reading: 751
  • I 752
  • Suggested Readings: 761
  • Suggested Reading: 773
  • Suggested Readings: 774
  • Suggested Readings: 777
  • Suggested Reading: 781
  • Suggested Readings: 785
  • Suggested Readings: 792
  • Suggested Readings: 795
  • Suggested Readings: 800
  • Suggested Readings: 801
  • Suggested Readings: 805
  • Suggested Readings: 813
  • Suggested Readings: 821
  • Suggested Readings: 825
  • Suggested Reading: 826
  • Suggested Readings: 828
  • Suggested Readings: 833
  • Suggested Readings: 836
  • Suggested Readings: 839
  • Suggested Reading: 843
  • Suggested Readings: 844
  • J 846
  • Suggested Readings: 847
  • Suggested Readings: 872
  • Suggested Reading: 874
  • K 884
  • Suggested Readings: 892
  • Suggested Readings: 895
  • Suggested Readings: 896
  • Suggested Reading: 898
  • Suggested Reading: 900
  • Suggested Readings: 904
  • Suggested Reading: 913
  • Suggested Readings: 914
  • Suggested Readings: 916
  • Suggested Readings: 917
  • Suggested Readings: 925
  • L 927
  • Suggested Readings: 934
  • Suggested Reading: 935
  • Suggested Readings: 938
  • Suggested Reading: 952
  • Suggested Readings: 957
  • Suggested Reading: 963
  • Suggested Readings: 966
  • Suggested Readings: 973
  • Suggested Readings: 979
  • Suggested Readings: 985
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 986

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.