The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2

By Cathal J. Nolan | Go to book overview

Suggested Readings:
David Lloyd George, War Memoirs (1933–1936); David Lloyd George, The Truth About the Peace Treaties, 2 vols. (1938); David Benedictus, Lloyd George (1981); Ian Packer, Lloyd George (1998).
local remedies.See exhaustion of local remedies.
Locarno, Treaties of (1925). It was Austen Chamberlain who guided the direction of the treaties developed at Locarno, first calming France and then convincing the French to make concessions on points of legitimate German grievance. For that he won the Nobel Prize for Peace, as did Stresemann and Briand. (1) In the West: The Belgians, French, and Germans agreed on the permanence of their mutual frontiers and the demilitarization of the Rhineland. The treaty was guaranteed by Britain and Italy. (2) In the East: Germany signed treaties of arbitration with Czechoslovakia and Poland. Those states were in turn assured by French treaties of guarantee; these promises were never kept in the Czech case. On the basis of Locarno, Germany was admitted to the League of Nations. There was much talk of a new, peaceful “spirit of Locarno,” but it did not last. Hitler hated Locarno and explicitly renounced the agreement in 1936 when he sent troops into the Rhineland. No one in the West tried to enforce a treaty that had been hailed as a major breakthrough just ten years earlier.
location. A state’s geographical place may significantly affect its power and foreign policy. For example, Belgium, Poland, and Lebanon are located in lowlying areas that historically served as invasion routes for larger powers or invading nomads; Russia’s flat expanses offered no natural barriers to invasion or to expansion; much of Africa was for centuries isolated by the Sahara from the main flow of history and technology; as a result of ocean barriers, Britain, Japan, and the United States enjoyed periods of isolation from continental conflicts; and some areas, such as Egypt or South Africa, were colonized primarily because of their position along key trade routes. See also English Channel; topography.
Lockerbie/PanAm bombing (1988).SeeLibya; Muamar Quadaffi.
locus regit actum. The place rules the act. A legal maxim that holds that jurisdiction concerning some legally significant act resides under the laws of the state (or other place) where the act was done.


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The Greenwood Encyclopedia of International Relations - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iv
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • F 530
  • Suggested Reading: 534
  • Suggested Readings: 547
  • Suggested Reading: 548
  • Suggested Reading: 557
  • Suggested Readings: 571
  • Suggested Readings: 572
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  • G 601
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  • H 681
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  • I 752
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  • J 846
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  • K 884
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  • L 927
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