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John Bell: The Time of My Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Prologue vii
  • Part 1 - Getting Educated *
  • Feeneys, Bells and Ryans 3
  • If You're a Catholic You Can Believe Anything 10
  • Green Corduroys and Suede 'Brothel Creepers' 21
  • Suds and the Players 26
  • Part 2 - The Old Tote and Royal Shakespeare Company *
  • Trofimov, Hamlet and Love 37
  • Wasn't I Ghastly Tonight? 43
  • The Right Way– the English Way 50
  • Bristol Old Vic 54
  • The Holy Grail– Stratford-On-Avon 59
  • Russia and Its Aftermath 70
  • Itchy Feet 79
  • Part 3 - The Nimrod Years *
  • Nida and King O'malley 91
  • A Stable in Nimrod Street 99
  • Nimrod in the Ascendant 108
  • Times Out 118
  • The Move to Belvoir Street 126
  • Upstairs, Downstairs 133
  • Nimrod: Decline and End 143
  • Manning Clark's History of Australia, the Musical 157
  • Part 4 - The Bell Shakespeare Company *
  • You Have to Start a Theatre Company 185
  • Why Shakespeare? 193
  • Back to the Circus 208
  • Actors at Work 222
  • A Day with Paul Keating 231
  • The Ensemble Spirit Develops 236
  • Berkoff's Coriolanus 244
  • Auctioning Kenneth Branagh 250
  • The Henrys and the Lesser-Knowns 253
  • A Rare and Remarkable Privilege 266
  • Index 277
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