VIII.

An American Phenomenon

The most sensational news of the day, said "the Rhamkatte Rooster," which was the way Josephus Daniels signed his column in the Raleigh News and Observer, came neither from Turkey nor Tibet; it was the report from Hyde Park that Eleanor Roosevelt had said, "I am tired. Let some of the youngsters carry on." She loved his column, Mrs. Roosevelt replied. "I had been walking around with pneumonia, so it was true that I was weary. I am fine, now, however ..."; and she did not add, for it was unnecessary, that she had resumed a schedule that once had led her husband to pray, "O Lord, make Eleanor tired."

"I sometimes think of quickly finishing up all the things I have to do, and then just not doing any more, but there always seem to be so many things to do." So she told an interviewer for the New Yorker in mid-1948. 1

In addition to her duties at the United Nations, she had resumed her lecture tours under the auspices of her manager, W. Colston Leigh. She did a regular radio commentary with Anna and a television show under Elliott's management. Her daily column appeared in newspapers ranging in number from seventy-five to ninety. She did a monthly question-and-answer page for McCall's, to which she had moved in 1949 from the Ladies' Home Journal. That year, too, the second volume of her autobiography, This I Remember, on which she had been working since 1946, appeared. She joined the boards of the American Association for the United Nations and of Brandeis University. She performed assorted chores for the Americans for Democratic Action, spoke frequently for the United Jewish Appeal, faithfully supported the work of the NAACP

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Eleanor: The Years Alone
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Eleanor: the Years Alone *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Author's Note *
  • Preface *
  • I - Champion of Her Husband's Ideals *
  • II - The Hardest-Working Delegate *
  • III - A Magna Charta for Mankind *
  • IV - Reluctant Cold -Warrior *
  • V - The United Nations and a Jewish Homeland *
  • VI - The 1948 Campaign: a New Party—not a Third Party *
  • VII - Cardinal and Former First Lady *
  • VIII - An American Phenomenon *
  • IX - America's Best Ambassador *
  • X - Resignation Accepted *
  • XI - Private Citizen Again *
  • XII - "Madly for Adlai" *
  • XIII - Two Bosses—khrushchev and De Sapio *
  • XIV - A New Generation Takes Over *
  • XV - To the End, Courage *
  • Appendix A: - Eleanor Roosevelt and the Nobel Peace Prize *
  • Appendix B: - Mrs. Roosevelt and the Sultan of Morocco *
  • References *
  • Index *
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