XI.

Private Citizen Again

The Eisenhower administration took office just as the "knownothing" campaign against U. S. support of the United Nations was reaching its shrillest crescendo. Senators McCarthy and McCarran regularly portrayed the organization and the Secretariat as a nesting place of Communist spies. Sen. John W. Bricker's amendment, which would seriously hobble the treaty-negotiating powers of the president, seemed assured of the two-thirds vote it needed for adoption in the Senate. The neoisolationist slogan "take the United States out of the UN and the UN out of the United States" was no longer considered a jesting matter. A counterattack at the grass roots was sorely needed.

One day, shortly before Eisenhower's inauguration, Clark Eichelberger, director of the American Association for the United Nations (AAUN), was surprised to see Mrs. Roosevelt walk into his office.

"Do you think you could use me in your Association as an educational volunteer?" she asked. Eichelberger, who had been fighting the collective security battle for thirty years, was rendered speechless by the windfall her offer represented and, even more, by the modesty with which she presented it. "I practically fell on the floor," he recalled. A firm believer in organization, she told Eichelberger that she wanted to devote herself to building chapters around the country and spreading the message of the United Nations, and when not traveling, she would spend two days a week at the AAUN's headquarters.

In January she moved into the small, austerely furnished cubicle that she insisted would suffice. "She walked into it as if it were

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Eleanor: The Years Alone
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Eleanor: the Years Alone *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Author's Note *
  • Preface *
  • I - Champion of Her Husband's Ideals *
  • II - The Hardest-Working Delegate *
  • III - A Magna Charta for Mankind *
  • IV - Reluctant Cold -Warrior *
  • V - The United Nations and a Jewish Homeland *
  • VI - The 1948 Campaign: a New Party—not a Third Party *
  • VII - Cardinal and Former First Lady *
  • VIII - An American Phenomenon *
  • IX - America's Best Ambassador *
  • X - Resignation Accepted *
  • XI - Private Citizen Again *
  • XII - "Madly for Adlai" *
  • XIII - Two Bosses—khrushchev and De Sapio *
  • XIV - A New Generation Takes Over *
  • XV - To the End, Courage *
  • Appendix A: - Eleanor Roosevelt and the Nobel Peace Prize *
  • Appendix B: - Mrs. Roosevelt and the Sultan of Morocco *
  • References *
  • Index *
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